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The 2015 season of the Indian Premier League (abbreviated as IPL 8 or Pepsi IPL 2015) is the eighth season of the IPL. Kolkata Knight Riders are the defending champions having won the title in the 2014 season. The complete tournament is expected to be held across different cities in India unlike the previous season. The tournament was started on Wednesday, 8 April 2015 after the end of the 2015 Cricket World Cup. A total of 60 T20 matches will be held in the entire tournament. No matches will be held in Kolkata between April 12 and April 25 due to Municipal Elections.

Franchises retained 123 players 8th IPL season before moving into auction. The released players provided an option to register themselves for auction. 6 Players were transferred across teams before the auction took place. In the Pepsi IPL 2015 auction held on February 16 at Bangalore, Yuvraj Singh was sold to Delhi Daredevils for 16 crores INR, for a record bid in IPL auction history. A total of 67 players were sold out in the auction and all franchises spent total of 87.60 Crores to buy players.

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Saturday, November 28, 2009

Graham Gooch to help coach England during South Africa Tests

Gooch, the current Essex batting coach, will draw on that same field of expertise to assist England in the build-up to the first Test at Centurion next month.

While England continue a one-day series, currently tied at 1-1 with two matches to play, Gooch will fly out to join the Performance Programme squad in Pretoria this weekend.

He will then link up with the Test specialists, coached by his fellow former Essex batsman Andy Flower, after the ODIs.

Hugh Morris, the England and Wales Cricket Board's managing director of England cricket, said: "Graham is rightly regarded as one of the best batting coaches in international cricket.

"We are delighted to have secured his services for a key period of our preparations leading up to the first Test."

sourch: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/cricket/international/england/6676769/Graham-Gooch-to-help-coach-England-during-South-Africa-Tests.html

Gambhir best Indian batsman now

http://askmeany.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/gauthamgambhiraskmeany.jpg

India won the second Test convincingly in Kanpur. MS Dhoni and the boys will be surprised with the ease with which they won this Test specially after the resistance Sri Lanka put up in Ahmedabad. They dominated the Test there but it was an absolute no-show here. It was a soft performance from them and I'm sure Kumar Sangakkara will be disappointed with that.

Winning the toss will always be an advantage in India and Dhoni has done that job well in the two Test matches. The Indians once again batted brilliantly which is so important on the first day of the Test as it just sets up the game for the team. Virender Sehwag must be a satisfied man after the hundred as his last Test hundred was nearly 15 months ago and this is something you don't associate with him in the Tests. His success-rate is superb and it amazes me why he doesn't replicate that in the one-dayers. Every time he bats he scores at such a pace that it puts the team in a winning position and that's the reason India got to 400 on day one in Kanpur. He played some breathtaking shots to the spinners and that's where he is so good. He has to learn to do that in one-day cricket as he has not performed to his potential in that format.

Gautam Gambhir once again batted beautifully, he is in the form of his life and just doesn't look like getting out. His admission that the reason he is playing well is because he feels secure in the team is so true and this should be applied to every player who is playing as the captain's faith is so important in a player's career and Dhoni has given him that. He just gets better and better everyday and is the best Indian batsman at the moment.

I also quietly admire his mental state as he decided to take the final Test off for his sister's marriage. A lot of people will jump off their seats on hearing that but I think he has done the right thing. Family is always first and sisters' marriages are always special to brothers and this is why Gambhir is regarded as a special human being by all in the cricket circle.

Sri Lanka will have a lot to worry before they go to Mumbai. They will have to rethink their combination as playing three spinners is a luxury against India. They must remember if two can't deliver the third one won't and the extra spinner will always be underbowled. So the best combination for Sri Lanka on Indian soil is two spinners and two fast bowlers.

But Sri Lanka need to rethink their fast bowling attack. Winning a Test in India with Angelo Mathews with the new ball is absolutely impossible. Sri Lanka may think of Dilhara Fernando in place of Mathews in their third Test side. The track at the Cricket Club of India would be helpful for fast bowlers and Dilhara would be the better option with his extra pace and bounce.

I am also eagerly waiting to watch Muttiah Muralitharan at his best in Mumbai because I have heard from different sources that Murali is playing his last series in India. This would be some extra motivation for him to mark the Test with an extraordinary performance. To do that he needs proper bowling support from the other end. Here Ajantha Mendis comes into the picture. I strongly believe that he is a class bowler and class is always permanent.

I feel he is lacking confidence and can come out any day with his excellent bouquet of variations. The reason for Mendis' success has been his accuracy and of late he has lost that. He needs to spend some time in the nets and this will come back soon. He must also remember that with the start he has had in his career he will go through this phase and he needs to hold his head high.

Players around the world will work him out and he needs to get it right so that he becomes the threat he used to be. His and Murali's performance will be key in the final Test where there will be assistance for them on the CCI pitch.

Coming to the Indian context, I am very happy with Sreesanth's performances. I always have huge faith in his talent. He is one of the rare fast bowlers who can use the seam properly both ways. Hope Sree will not look back from here and justify his talent properly. He can do everything for the rest of his life but cannot get back this golden time of his cricketing career.

I strongly feel that Indian fast bowling attack with Zaheer Khan, Sreesanth and Ishant Sharma could do well both home and abroad. Now it's Sree's turn to take this opportunity and become a permanent member of the team.

It will be a good Test in Mumbai as the pitch will provide a fair contest between the bat and ball. The Sri Lankans will have to improve their performance or it will be an uphill task right till the end of the one-day series.

Sourch: http://www.cricinfo.com/magazine/content/current/story/437237.html

Gambhir best Indian batsman now

http://askmeany.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/gauthamgambhiraskmeany.jpg

India won the second Test convincingly in Kanpur. MS Dhoni and the boys will be surprised with the ease with which they won this Test specially after the resistance Sri Lanka put up in Ahmedabad. They dominated the Test there but it was an absolute no-show here. It was a soft performance from them and I'm sure Kumar Sangakkara will be disappointed with that.

Winning the toss will always be an advantage in India and Dhoni has done that job well in the two Test matches. The Indians once again batted brilliantly which is so important on the first day of the Test as it just sets up the game for the team. Virender Sehwag must be a satisfied man after the hundred as his last Test hundred was nearly 15 months ago and this is something you don't associate with him in the Tests. His success-rate is superb and it amazes me why he doesn't replicate that in the one-dayers. Every time he bats he scores at such a pace that it puts the team in a winning position and that's the reason India got to 400 on day one in Kanpur. He played some breathtaking shots to the spinners and that's where he is so good. He has to learn to do that in one-day cricket as he has not performed to his potential in that format.

Gautam Gambhir once again batted beautifully, he is in the form of his life and just doesn't look like getting out. His admission that the reason he is playing well is because he feels secure in the team is so true and this should be applied to every player who is playing as the captain's faith is so important in a player's career and Dhoni has given him that. He just gets better and better everyday and is the best Indian batsman at the moment.

I also quietly admire his mental state as he decided to take the final Test off for his sister's marriage. A lot of people will jump off their seats on hearing that but I think he has done the right thing. Family is always first and sisters' marriages are always special to brothers and this is why Gambhir is regarded as a special human being by all in the cricket circle.

Sri Lanka will have a lot to worry before they go to Mumbai. They will have to rethink their combination as playing three spinners is a luxury against India. They must remember if two can't deliver the third one won't and the extra spinner will always be underbowled. So the best combination for Sri Lanka on Indian soil is two spinners and two fast bowlers.

But Sri Lanka need to rethink their fast bowling attack. Winning a Test in India with Angelo Mathews with the new ball is absolutely impossible. Sri Lanka may think of Dilhara Fernando in place of Mathews in their third Test side. The track at the Cricket Club of India would be helpful for fast bowlers and Dilhara would be the better option with his extra pace and bounce.

I am also eagerly waiting to watch Muttiah Muralitharan at his best in Mumbai because I have heard from different sources that Murali is playing his last series in India. This would be some extra motivation for him to mark the Test with an extraordinary performance. To do that he needs proper bowling support from the other end. Here Ajantha Mendis comes into the picture. I strongly believe that he is a class bowler and class is always permanent.

I feel he is lacking confidence and can come out any day with his excellent bouquet of variations. The reason for Mendis' success has been his accuracy and of late he has lost that. He needs to spend some time in the nets and this will come back soon. He must also remember that with the start he has had in his career he will go through this phase and he needs to hold his head high.

Players around the world will work him out and he needs to get it right so that he becomes the threat he used to be. His and Murali's performance will be key in the final Test where there will be assistance for them on the CCI pitch.

Coming to the Indian context, I am very happy with Sreesanth's performances. I always have huge faith in his talent. He is one of the rare fast bowlers who can use the seam properly both ways. Hope Sree will not look back from here and justify his talent properly. He can do everything for the rest of his life but cannot get back this golden time of his cricketing career.

I strongly feel that Indian fast bowling attack with Zaheer Khan, Sreesanth and Ishant Sharma could do well both home and abroad. Now it's Sree's turn to take this opportunity and become a permanent member of the team.

It will be a good Test in Mumbai as the pitch will provide a fair contest between the bat and ball. The Sri Lankans will have to improve their performance or it will be an uphill task right till the end of the one-day series.

Sourch: http://www.cricinfo.com/magazine/content/current/story/437237.html

Top-order flop gives Pakistan slim hope

New Zealand's bowlers would have been entitled to glare across the dressing room at the end of a depressing fourth day and grumble about another fine mess their batsmen had dropped them into.

Having done such a poor job of batting Pakistan out of the opening test at University Oval, the hosts will start the final day with a real chance of losing, which would turn most of the evidence of the first three days on its head.

Yet it is still an even bet, bearing in mind the worn nature of a final day pitch with variable bounce. New Zealand will start at 147 for eight, holding an overall lead of 244.

"I think anything over 250 is going to be a big ask for them, especially if we do everything in a disciplined manner and turn up prepared to win the game," seamer Chris Martin said last night.

sourch: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/cricket/news/article.cfm?c_id=29&objectid=10612154

Friday, November 27, 2009

How cricket moved from spitting feathers to lashings of runs

Javed Miandad

Once, during a searing day in the field many years ago in a foreign land a young bowler, suffering a thumping head, asked for some pain killers to be brought out. They duly arrived, with a glass of water to wash them down, but before he could swallow them an umpire seized the glass and emptied all but a quarter. "Minimum water," he insisted, "outside the drinks break."

Bizarre? Certainly, but that is how it was. I was recounting this story to an old colleague last week, and we both agreed that in the three decades since that incident a strong element of the physical challenge of cricket – the determination to make it through to the next drinks break or interval without taking on fluids – has disappeared.

It is hard to pinpoint precisely where the change came. More, it was a gradual metamorphosis from a situation where rehydration was something carried out one way or another after a day's play to the other extreme which maybe came to a head in the 2005 Ashes series, when England players appeared to spend more time in the loo than they did on the field so relentlessly did they take on their fluids throughout the day. Perhaps it started in the 80s, when official drinks breaks mid-session (or twice a session in real heat and humidity) were augmented by surreptitious drinks placed on the boundary. Gradually it became accepted practice, until now support staff take the field at every opportunity – fall of wicket, break for third umpire, change of gloves, anything – to top up the levels.

I looked at some research, specific to elite cricketers, carried out by the Australian Institute of Sport, and it is quite revealing. The only published study of fluid losses during cricket play found that fast bowlers were unable to maintain good hydration by drinking during the formal breaks in cricket on a hot day. In fact, after two two-hour sessions of play, players had lost an average of 4.3% of body weight against a maximum recommended loss of 2%. Another study, of sub-elite cricketers, found that a fluid deficit of just under 3% of body weight impaired their ability to undertake a shuttle run in moderate weather conditions. The fluid deficit was also associated with a reduction in the accuracy of bowling by around 15%. In contrast, bowling skills and endurance were maintained when players drank sufficient fluid over the session to keep the deficit to near enough 1% of body weight.

Again, without regard to the specifics, this is all pretty obvious, but is it a good thing as far as cricket as a physical sport is concerned. Do we want to see players as spritely at the end of the day as they are at the start, or should we expect to see more tangible evidence of the sapping effect a hard day's play can have? Personally, I would not wish on anyone the experience I once had of playing a three-day game in Hyderabad, in Pakistan's Sind desert, where all bottled water had gone missing, leaving only Fanta. Yet I do think it has been taken to ridiculous proportions now. I would like to see a return to official drinks breaks only, and no cooler bins around the boundary either.

This is something the various committees of former players, gathered by MCC and ICC to provide strategies for the future of the game, might like to consider when discussing the increasingly uneven contest between bat and ball. Yet another monotonous run fest, in Kanpur, is doing its best to kill Test cricket as a contest, and the focus, as ever, will be on the standard of pitches, restrictions on bowlers, and bats with a sweet spot the size of Yorkshire, but maybe they could view the effect of drinks too.

Don't laugh. For if bowlers can run out of steam so can batsmen. But a bowler's concentration wanders to little effect other than bad deliveries: a batsman wavers and he is gone. The figures for extended innings in Test cricket over the past 30 years are quite telling. In the decade 1980-90, before isotonic drinks and all that became mainstream, there was an average of one individual innings of 200 or more every 7.6 matches. For the next decade the figure was 8.26, but since the millennium, it has fallen to 4.89. Take it to 250 plus, and we find there were only four such innings played in the 80s, 12 in the 90s, and 24 since, one every 66.5, 28.9 and 19 games respectively. Of triple centuries, there were none in the 80s, four in the 90s, and seven plus one quadruple since. Clearly batsmen are able to spend longer at the crease without concentration levels falling, and that is not just about basic fitness levels.

In this regard, strictly as a player, I have to admit to a pang of nostalgia. Of course the arguments to the contrary are indisputable. Why would you not wish to ensure maximum performance levels? Studies have found that a loss of 2% or more of body weight due to sweating is linked to a drop in blood volume, causing the heart to work harder, possibly resulting in muscle cramps, dizziness, fatigue and even heat illness. Well we all remember that. It was called being knackered.

Batsmen and bowlers alike have ended up on saline drips – Dean Jones the most celebrated for his autopilot dehydrated double hundred in Chennai – but, as far as I am aware, no one died from playing top-level cricket in such circumstances and there was a strange masochistic satisfaction at the end of it.

How cricket moved from spitting feathers to lashings of runs

Javed Miandad

Once, during a searing day in the field many years ago in a foreign land a young bowler, suffering a thumping head, asked for some pain killers to be brought out. They duly arrived, with a glass of water to wash them down, but before he could swallow them an umpire seized the glass and emptied all but a quarter. "Minimum water," he insisted, "outside the drinks break."

Bizarre? Certainly, but that is how it was. I was recounting this story to an old colleague last week, and we both agreed that in the three decades since that incident a strong element of the physical challenge of cricket – the determination to make it through to the next drinks break or interval without taking on fluids – has disappeared.

It is hard to pinpoint precisely where the change came. More, it was a gradual metamorphosis from a situation where rehydration was something carried out one way or another after a day's play to the other extreme which maybe came to a head in the 2005 Ashes series, when England players appeared to spend more time in the loo than they did on the field so relentlessly did they take on their fluids throughout the day. Perhaps it started in the 80s, when official drinks breaks mid-session (or twice a session in real heat and humidity) were augmented by surreptitious drinks placed on the boundary. Gradually it became accepted practice, until now support staff take the field at every opportunity – fall of wicket, break for third umpire, change of gloves, anything – to top up the levels.

I looked at some research, specific to elite cricketers, carried out by the Australian Institute of Sport, and it is quite revealing. The only published study of fluid losses during cricket play found that fast bowlers were unable to maintain good hydration by drinking during the formal breaks in cricket on a hot day. In fact, after two two-hour sessions of play, players had lost an average of 4.3% of body weight against a maximum recommended loss of 2%. Another study, of sub-elite cricketers, found that a fluid deficit of just under 3% of body weight impaired their ability to undertake a shuttle run in moderate weather conditions. The fluid deficit was also associated with a reduction in the accuracy of bowling by around 15%. In contrast, bowling skills and endurance were maintained when players drank sufficient fluid over the session to keep the deficit to near enough 1% of body weight.

Again, without regard to the specifics, this is all pretty obvious, but is it a good thing as far as cricket as a physical sport is concerned. Do we want to see players as spritely at the end of the day as they are at the start, or should we expect to see more tangible evidence of the sapping effect a hard day's play can have? Personally, I would not wish on anyone the experience I once had of playing a three-day game in Hyderabad, in Pakistan's Sind desert, where all bottled water had gone missing, leaving only Fanta. Yet I do think it has been taken to ridiculous proportions now. I would like to see a return to official drinks breaks only, and no cooler bins around the boundary either.

This is something the various committees of former players, gathered by MCC and ICC to provide strategies for the future of the game, might like to consider when discussing the increasingly uneven contest between bat and ball. Yet another monotonous run fest, in Kanpur, is doing its best to kill Test cricket as a contest, and the focus, as ever, will be on the standard of pitches, restrictions on bowlers, and bats with a sweet spot the size of Yorkshire, but maybe they could view the effect of drinks too.

Don't laugh. For if bowlers can run out of steam so can batsmen. But a bowler's concentration wanders to little effect other than bad deliveries: a batsman wavers and he is gone. The figures for extended innings in Test cricket over the past 30 years are quite telling. In the decade 1980-90, before isotonic drinks and all that became mainstream, there was an average of one individual innings of 200 or more every 7.6 matches. For the next decade the figure was 8.26, but since the millennium, it has fallen to 4.89. Take it to 250 plus, and we find there were only four such innings played in the 80s, 12 in the 90s, and 24 since, one every 66.5, 28.9 and 19 games respectively. Of triple centuries, there were none in the 80s, four in the 90s, and seven plus one quadruple since. Clearly batsmen are able to spend longer at the crease without concentration levels falling, and that is not just about basic fitness levels.

In this regard, strictly as a player, I have to admit to a pang of nostalgia. Of course the arguments to the contrary are indisputable. Why would you not wish to ensure maximum performance levels? Studies have found that a loss of 2% or more of body weight due to sweating is linked to a drop in blood volume, causing the heart to work harder, possibly resulting in muscle cramps, dizziness, fatigue and even heat illness. Well we all remember that. It was called being knackered.

Batsmen and bowlers alike have ended up on saline drips – Dean Jones the most celebrated for his autopilot dehydrated double hundred in Chennai – but, as far as I am aware, no one died from playing top-level cricket in such circumstances and there was a strange masochistic satisfaction at the end of it.

Akmal brothers rescue Pakistan

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND: Kamran Akmal of Pakistan walks off after being dismissed for 82 runs during day three of the first Test against New Zealand at University Oval in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Brothers Umar and Kamran Akmal shared in a 176-run stand for Pakistan as their team made 307/8 by stumps on day three of the first Test against New Zealand in Dunedin.

Umar made 129 and Kamran 82 as they rescued the visitors, who were 85/5 when the siblings came together.

Shane Bond picked up 4/93 for the hosts in 24 overs, with Chris Martin and captain Daniel Vettori each collecting two wickets.

Pakistan still trail by 122 runs; New Zealand made 429.

ý Australia dominated day one of the first Test against the West Indies in Brisbane yesterday, making 322/5.

Simon Katich (92) just missed his ninth Test century, and captain Ricky Ponting (55) and Michael Hussey (66) both made half centuries after Shane Watson was out in the third over.

Michael Clarke chipped in with 41, and at stumps Marcus North was not out on 42 and Brad Haddin was unbeaten with 9.

Dwayne Bravo was the pick of the Windies bowlers with 2/66 in 21 overs.

Akmal brothers rescue Pakistan

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND: Kamran Akmal of Pakistan walks off after being dismissed for 82 runs during day three of the first Test against New Zealand at University Oval in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Brothers Umar and Kamran Akmal shared in a 176-run stand for Pakistan as their team made 307/8 by stumps on day three of the first Test against New Zealand in Dunedin.

Umar made 129 and Kamran 82 as they rescued the visitors, who were 85/5 when the siblings came together.

Shane Bond picked up 4/93 for the hosts in 24 overs, with Chris Martin and captain Daniel Vettori each collecting two wickets.

Pakistan still trail by 122 runs; New Zealand made 429.

ý Australia dominated day one of the first Test against the West Indies in Brisbane yesterday, making 322/5.

Simon Katich (92) just missed his ninth Test century, and captain Ricky Ponting (55) and Michael Hussey (66) both made half centuries after Shane Watson was out in the third over.

Michael Clarke chipped in with 41, and at stumps Marcus North was not out on 42 and Brad Haddin was unbeaten with 9.

Dwayne Bravo was the pick of the Windies bowlers with 2/66 in 21 overs.

Black Caps win first test thriller

http://static.icc-cricket.yahoo.net/ugc/images/04CAA7E30DE300F0D2811A214DE2D70F_1255410020327_816.jpg

Captain Daniel Vettori took the final two wickets as New Zealand won the first test against Pakistan by 32 runs at University Oval in Dunedin.

Vettori got Mohammad Aamer to spoon a ball back to him for 15, taking the second caught and bowled of the innings, to end the test as Pakistan were all out for 218 chasing 251 runs for victory on the final day.

Vettori had Mohammad Asif caught at slip by Ross Taylor for zero, leaving Pakistan at 213-9, needing 38 more runs for victory or to bat out the remaining overs for a draw.

Three quick Pakistan wickets swung momentum back to New Zealand in the tense final session.

Shane Bond broke the key partnership of Pakistan's Akmal brothers, Umar and Kamran, then Iain O'Brien struck in the next over, leaving Pakistan eight wickets down and still requiring 47 runs.

Bond took a superb caught and bowled chance to dismiss debutant Umar Akmal for 75, with Pakistan at 195-6, then O'Brien, who had dislocated the ring finger on his bowling hand earlier in the final session, trapped Kamran Akmal for 27, putting the visitors at 197-7.

Soon after, O'Brien struck again, getting Umar Gul to drive in the air straight to New Zealand captain Daniel Vettori at wide mid-off, leaving Pakistan 203-8.

O'Brien got a vital breakthrough just before tea, incuding a top edge from Shoaib Malik through to wicketkeeper Brendon McCullum, leaving Pakistan at 165-5 at the tea break.

The wicket ended a 66-run fifth-wicket partnership between Malik and debutant Umar Akmal that threatened to take the game away from the Black Caps.

Akmal remains at the crease on 66 not out, recently joined by his older brother Kamran. With at least 30 overs remaining to be bowled in the day, Pakistan need less than three runs per over to claim the first of three tests.

Brilliant youngster Akmal was leading Pakistan's charge to victory, backing up his first innings century with a half-century midway through the middle session. Pakistan were 148-4 chasing 251 to win midway through the second session.

Chris Martin had grabbed the vital wicket of Pakistan skipper Mohammad Yousuf midway through the session as New Zealand fought back. But then Akmal took control.

Earlier New Zealand were dismissed for 153 in their second innings.

Resuming on 147-8, New Zealand lost Iain O'Brien on his overnight score of four and Grant Elliott for 25.

Umar Gul took both wickets to end with figures of three for 41. Fellow pace bowler Mohammad Asif took four for 43 to finish with a match analysis of eight for 151 in his first test for more than two years.

Black Caps win first test thriller

http://static.icc-cricket.yahoo.net/ugc/images/04CAA7E30DE300F0D2811A214DE2D70F_1255410020327_816.jpg

Captain Daniel Vettori took the final two wickets as New Zealand won the first test against Pakistan by 32 runs at University Oval in Dunedin.

Vettori got Mohammad Aamer to spoon a ball back to him for 15, taking the second caught and bowled of the innings, to end the test as Pakistan were all out for 218 chasing 251 runs for victory on the final day.

Vettori had Mohammad Asif caught at slip by Ross Taylor for zero, leaving Pakistan at 213-9, needing 38 more runs for victory or to bat out the remaining overs for a draw.

Three quick Pakistan wickets swung momentum back to New Zealand in the tense final session.

Shane Bond broke the key partnership of Pakistan's Akmal brothers, Umar and Kamran, then Iain O'Brien struck in the next over, leaving Pakistan eight wickets down and still requiring 47 runs.

Bond took a superb caught and bowled chance to dismiss debutant Umar Akmal for 75, with Pakistan at 195-6, then O'Brien, who had dislocated the ring finger on his bowling hand earlier in the final session, trapped Kamran Akmal for 27, putting the visitors at 197-7.

Soon after, O'Brien struck again, getting Umar Gul to drive in the air straight to New Zealand captain Daniel Vettori at wide mid-off, leaving Pakistan 203-8.

O'Brien got a vital breakthrough just before tea, incuding a top edge from Shoaib Malik through to wicketkeeper Brendon McCullum, leaving Pakistan at 165-5 at the tea break.

The wicket ended a 66-run fifth-wicket partnership between Malik and debutant Umar Akmal that threatened to take the game away from the Black Caps.

Akmal remains at the crease on 66 not out, recently joined by his older brother Kamran. With at least 30 overs remaining to be bowled in the day, Pakistan need less than three runs per over to claim the first of three tests.

Brilliant youngster Akmal was leading Pakistan's charge to victory, backing up his first innings century with a half-century midway through the middle session. Pakistan were 148-4 chasing 251 to win midway through the second session.

Chris Martin had grabbed the vital wicket of Pakistan skipper Mohammad Yousuf midway through the session as New Zealand fought back. But then Akmal took control.

Earlier New Zealand were dismissed for 153 in their second innings.

Resuming on 147-8, New Zealand lost Iain O'Brien on his overnight score of four and Grant Elliott for 25.

Umar Gul took both wickets to end with figures of three for 41. Fellow pace bowler Mohammad Asif took four for 43 to finish with a match analysis of eight for 151 in his first test for more than two years.

Sreesanth puts India in control

Shanthakumaran Sreesanth is congratulated by teammates after he took the wicket of Sri Lanka's Rangana Herath.
Sri Lanka was staring at a massive defeat yesterday after India's Shanthakumaran Sreesanth grabbed 6-85 on the third day of the second cricket Test here.

Sreesanth, 26, took the second five-wicket haul of his career to bowl out Sri Lanka for 229 in their first innings and rocked them again in their second knock by dismissing in-form opener Tillakaratne Dilshan (11).

The fast bowler's efforts helped India take a 413-run lead on the first innings and enforce a follow on.

At close, Sri Lanka were reeling on 4-57 in their second innings, trailing India by 356 runs.

India, who amassed 642 in their first innings, need six more Sri Lankan wickets to claim an innings victory and go 1-0 up in the three-Test series. The first match in Ahmedabad ended in a draw.

Thilan Samaraweera was batting on one while Angelo Mathews was on two when stumps were drawn for the day, five overs before scheduled close due to bad light.

Sreesanth, who took three wickets in the morning session, added two more to his tally to return impressive first-innings figures of 5-75 in 22 overs at the Green Park stadium.

Spinners Pragyan Ojha (2-37) and Harbhajan Singh (2-54) wiped off the tail to wrap up the Sri Lankan innings shortly after tea.

India tasted early success again in the second innings when Dilshan edged an outswinger from Sreesanth on 11, failing to make amends for his golden duck in the first knock.

Part-time spinner Virender Sehwag trapped the other opener Tharanga Paranavitana leg before wicket before Mahela Jayawardene and Sri Lankan captain Kumar Sangakkara lost their wickets cheaply.

Mahela was run out while Sangakkara inside-edged onto his stumps off Harbhajan.

Sreesanth earlier broke a fighting 60-run partnership between Mahela (47) and Prasanna Jayawardene to ensure there was no repeat of their heroics at Ahmedabad.

The duo had shared a world-record stand of 351 for the sixth wicket with Mahela making 275 and Prasanna contributing 154.

Prasanna (39) edged Sreesanth to be caught behind the wicket while Mahela became the maiden Test victim of Ojha when he offered a simple catch to Sachin Tendulkar at mid-on.

Sreesanth marked his comeback to international cricket in style, dismissing Sangakkara, Paranavitana and Samaraweera in a fiery starting spell.

Harbhajan chipped in with the wicket of Mathews (13) to have Sri Lanka reeling at 4-111.

Sri Lanka's batsmen resumed the day at 1-66 but failed to build big partnerships, with Sreesanth and his new-ball partner Zaheer Khan troubling them with their line and length.

Sreesanth gave India an early breakthrough when Paranavitana (38) poked at a slightly wide delivery to be caught by a diving Dhoni behind the stumps.

The fast bowler, returning to the Indian squad after playing his last Test 19 months ago at the same venue here against South Africa, struck again four overs later to remove the other overnight batsman, Sangakkara (44).

Sreesanth puts India in control

Shanthakumaran Sreesanth is congratulated by teammates after he took the wicket of Sri Lanka's Rangana Herath.
Sri Lanka was staring at a massive defeat yesterday after India's Shanthakumaran Sreesanth grabbed 6-85 on the third day of the second cricket Test here.

Sreesanth, 26, took the second five-wicket haul of his career to bowl out Sri Lanka for 229 in their first innings and rocked them again in their second knock by dismissing in-form opener Tillakaratne Dilshan (11).

The fast bowler's efforts helped India take a 413-run lead on the first innings and enforce a follow on.

At close, Sri Lanka were reeling on 4-57 in their second innings, trailing India by 356 runs.

India, who amassed 642 in their first innings, need six more Sri Lankan wickets to claim an innings victory and go 1-0 up in the three-Test series. The first match in Ahmedabad ended in a draw.

Thilan Samaraweera was batting on one while Angelo Mathews was on two when stumps were drawn for the day, five overs before scheduled close due to bad light.

Sreesanth, who took three wickets in the morning session, added two more to his tally to return impressive first-innings figures of 5-75 in 22 overs at the Green Park stadium.

Spinners Pragyan Ojha (2-37) and Harbhajan Singh (2-54) wiped off the tail to wrap up the Sri Lankan innings shortly after tea.

India tasted early success again in the second innings when Dilshan edged an outswinger from Sreesanth on 11, failing to make amends for his golden duck in the first knock.

Part-time spinner Virender Sehwag trapped the other opener Tharanga Paranavitana leg before wicket before Mahela Jayawardene and Sri Lankan captain Kumar Sangakkara lost their wickets cheaply.

Mahela was run out while Sangakkara inside-edged onto his stumps off Harbhajan.

Sreesanth earlier broke a fighting 60-run partnership between Mahela (47) and Prasanna Jayawardene to ensure there was no repeat of their heroics at Ahmedabad.

The duo had shared a world-record stand of 351 for the sixth wicket with Mahela making 275 and Prasanna contributing 154.

Prasanna (39) edged Sreesanth to be caught behind the wicket while Mahela became the maiden Test victim of Ojha when he offered a simple catch to Sachin Tendulkar at mid-on.

Sreesanth marked his comeback to international cricket in style, dismissing Sangakkara, Paranavitana and Samaraweera in a fiery starting spell.

Harbhajan chipped in with the wicket of Mathews (13) to have Sri Lanka reeling at 4-111.

Sri Lanka's batsmen resumed the day at 1-66 but failed to build big partnerships, with Sreesanth and his new-ball partner Zaheer Khan troubling them with their line and length.

Sreesanth gave India an early breakthrough when Paranavitana (38) poked at a slightly wide delivery to be caught by a diving Dhoni behind the stumps.

The fast bowler, returning to the Indian squad after playing his last Test 19 months ago at the same venue here against South Africa, struck again four overs later to remove the other overnight batsman, Sangakkara (44).

Sreesanth puts India in control

Shanthakumaran Sreesanth is congratulated by teammates after he took the wicket of Sri Lanka's Rangana Herath.
Sri Lanka was staring at a massive defeat yesterday after India's Shanthakumaran Sreesanth grabbed 6-85 on the third day of the second cricket Test here.

Sreesanth, 26, took the second five-wicket haul of his career to bowl out Sri Lanka for 229 in their first innings and rocked them again in their second knock by dismissing in-form opener Tillakaratne Dilshan (11).

The fast bowler's efforts helped India take a 413-run lead on the first innings and enforce a follow on.

At close, Sri Lanka were reeling on 4-57 in their second innings, trailing India by 356 runs.

India, who amassed 642 in their first innings, need six more Sri Lankan wickets to claim an innings victory and go 1-0 up in the three-Test series. The first match in Ahmedabad ended in a draw.

Thilan Samaraweera was batting on one while Angelo Mathews was on two when stumps were drawn for the day, five overs before scheduled close due to bad light.

Sreesanth, who took three wickets in the morning session, added two more to his tally to return impressive first-innings figures of 5-75 in 22 overs at the Green Park stadium.

Spinners Pragyan Ojha (2-37) and Harbhajan Singh (2-54) wiped off the tail to wrap up the Sri Lankan innings shortly after tea.

India tasted early success again in the second innings when Dilshan edged an outswinger from Sreesanth on 11, failing to make amends for his golden duck in the first knock.

Part-time spinner Virender Sehwag trapped the other opener Tharanga Paranavitana leg before wicket before Mahela Jayawardene and Sri Lankan captain Kumar Sangakkara lost their wickets cheaply.

Mahela was run out while Sangakkara inside-edged onto his stumps off Harbhajan.

Sreesanth earlier broke a fighting 60-run partnership between Mahela (47) and Prasanna Jayawardene to ensure there was no repeat of their heroics at Ahmedabad.

The duo had shared a world-record stand of 351 for the sixth wicket with Mahela making 275 and Prasanna contributing 154.

Prasanna (39) edged Sreesanth to be caught behind the wicket while Mahela became the maiden Test victim of Ojha when he offered a simple catch to Sachin Tendulkar at mid-on.

Sreesanth marked his comeback to international cricket in style, dismissing Sangakkara, Paranavitana and Samaraweera in a fiery starting spell.

Harbhajan chipped in with the wicket of Mathews (13) to have Sri Lanka reeling at 4-111.

Sri Lanka's batsmen resumed the day at 1-66 but failed to build big partnerships, with Sreesanth and his new-ball partner Zaheer Khan troubling them with their line and length.

Sreesanth gave India an early breakthrough when Paranavitana (38) poked at a slightly wide delivery to be caught by a diving Dhoni behind the stumps.

The fast bowler, returning to the Indian squad after playing his last Test 19 months ago at the same venue here against South Africa, struck again four overs later to remove the other overnight batsman, Sangakkara (44).

India batsman Rahul Dravid passes Test runs landmark


Rahul Dravid celebrates his 28th Test century
India had resumed on 417-2 and piled on the runs in the first two sessions.

Dravid, 36, made a superb 144 before India succumbed to spinner Rangana Herath's five wickets, all out for 642 when a score over 700 seemed certain.

Zaheer Khan took Tillakaratne Dilshan's wicket before Sri Lanka had scored, but the visitors rallied to 66-1 at stumps.

Both Tharanga Paranavitana and Kumar Sangakkara finished on 30 not out.

606: DEBATE
The pitch has already started turning and if India gets couple of wickets early on SL could really struggle

NM

India's innings in the morning had revolved around Dravid, the middle-order batsman on 85 at the start of the day after scoring 177 in the first innings of the Ahmedabad Test.

In a near-flawless display on a friendly wicket, he became the third Indian to reach three figures with a straight drive past fast bowler Chanaka Welegedara.

Dravid went past Allan Border's mark of 11,174 runs in Test cricket, leaving him behind just team-mate Sachin Tendulkar, West Indies' Brian Lara and Australian skipper Ricky Ponting on the all-time scorer list.

Dravid eventually fell just before lunch when left-armer Herath palmed a shot from Laxman onto the stumps at the non-striker's end and caught Dravid backing up too far.
By then Dravid had already lost overnight batting partner Tendulkar (40), who fell to the guile of Ajantha Mendis.

VVS Laxman (63) and Yuvraj Singh (67) continued to lay into Sri Lanka's innocuous attack, Laxman falling to Herath when he attempted to lift the pace.

The spinner added the scalps of Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Harbhajan Singh before the afternoon session closed, then picked up the wickets of Zaheer Khan and Shanthakumaran Sreesanth shortly after tea.

Herath finished with figures of five for 121 from 33 overs, while Mendis claimed two for 162 from 38.

India batsman Rahul Dravid passes Test runs landmark


Rahul Dravid celebrates his 28th Test century
India had resumed on 417-2 and piled on the runs in the first two sessions.

Dravid, 36, made a superb 144 before India succumbed to spinner Rangana Herath's five wickets, all out for 642 when a score over 700 seemed certain.

Zaheer Khan took Tillakaratne Dilshan's wicket before Sri Lanka had scored, but the visitors rallied to 66-1 at stumps.

Both Tharanga Paranavitana and Kumar Sangakkara finished on 30 not out.

606: DEBATE
The pitch has already started turning and if India gets couple of wickets early on SL could really struggle

NM

India's innings in the morning had revolved around Dravid, the middle-order batsman on 85 at the start of the day after scoring 177 in the first innings of the Ahmedabad Test.

In a near-flawless display on a friendly wicket, he became the third Indian to reach three figures with a straight drive past fast bowler Chanaka Welegedara.

Dravid went past Allan Border's mark of 11,174 runs in Test cricket, leaving him behind just team-mate Sachin Tendulkar, West Indies' Brian Lara and Australian skipper Ricky Ponting on the all-time scorer list.

Dravid eventually fell just before lunch when left-armer Herath palmed a shot from Laxman onto the stumps at the non-striker's end and caught Dravid backing up too far.
By then Dravid had already lost overnight batting partner Tendulkar (40), who fell to the guile of Ajantha Mendis.

VVS Laxman (63) and Yuvraj Singh (67) continued to lay into Sri Lanka's innocuous attack, Laxman falling to Herath when he attempted to lift the pace.

The spinner added the scalps of Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Harbhajan Singh before the afternoon session closed, then picked up the wickets of Zaheer Khan and Shanthakumaran Sreesanth shortly after tea.

Herath finished with figures of five for 121 from 33 overs, while Mendis claimed two for 162 from 38.

Thursday, November 26, 2009

Misbah to leave for NZ on Saturday

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) has finally given green signal to middle-order batsman Misbah-ul-Haq to join the national team in New Zealand before the start of the second Test in Wellington from Dec 3.

Though, the PCB will officially announce the date of Misbah’s departure during the final stages of the ongoing first Test in Dunedin, reliable sources told Dawn that Misbah, 35, would be leaving on Nov 28 (Saturday).

Pakistan captain Mohammad Yousuf had wanted Misbah as replacement of regular captain Younis Khan, who opted to quit the three-Test series against New Zealand after losing the ODI rubber 1-2 in the UAE.

However, Yousuf failed to get Misbah before the first Test started on Nov 24 because the selection committee was in no mood to send Younis’ replacement.

The selectors preferred to first watch performance of the batsmen in the first Test, since 17 players are already in New Zealand.

Though the selectors succeeded in convincing the PCB Chairman Ijaz Butt to defer the decision till witnessing the players’ performance in the first Test, now they have decided that Misbah would go to New Zealand on Saturday as Yousuf still wanted the player in his squad.

Both the PCB chairman and chief selector have agreed to give weight to Yousuf’s pleas while leading the squad in New Zealand.

Misbah to leave for NZ on Saturday

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) has finally given green signal to middle-order batsman Misbah-ul-Haq to join the national team in New Zealand before the start of the second Test in Wellington from Dec 3.

Though, the PCB will officially announce the date of Misbah’s departure during the final stages of the ongoing first Test in Dunedin, reliable sources told Dawn that Misbah, 35, would be leaving on Nov 28 (Saturday).

Pakistan captain Mohammad Yousuf had wanted Misbah as replacement of regular captain Younis Khan, who opted to quit the three-Test series against New Zealand after losing the ODI rubber 1-2 in the UAE.

However, Yousuf failed to get Misbah before the first Test started on Nov 24 because the selection committee was in no mood to send Younis’ replacement.

The selectors preferred to first watch performance of the batsmen in the first Test, since 17 players are already in New Zealand.

Though the selectors succeeded in convincing the PCB Chairman Ijaz Butt to defer the decision till witnessing the players’ performance in the first Test, now they have decided that Misbah would go to New Zealand on Saturday as Yousuf still wanted the player in his squad.

Both the PCB chairman and chief selector have agreed to give weight to Yousuf’s pleas while leading the squad in New Zealand.

Intikhab Alam predicts 'great future' for Umar Akmal


Umar Akmal reaches his hundred, New Zealand v Pakistan, 1st Test, Dunedin, 3rd day, November 26, 2009

Pakistan coach Intikhab Alam has predicted a "great future" in international cricket for debutant Umar Akmal, who rescued his team with a brazen century after the top order had collapsed on the third day in Dunedin. Umar began his innings after Shane Bond and Chris Martin had reduced Pakistan to 85 for 5, trailing by 344 runs in the first innings. He dominated a 176-run partnership with his older brother Kamran and helped Pakistan avoid the follow-on.

Umar has acquired a reputation of being a dasher with a cool head in the limited-overs formats and he began his Test career by cutting Bond for four off his first ball. He raced to his century with three consecutive boundaries off Iain O'Brien, eroding New Zealand's advantage with aggression: Umar hit 21 fours and two sixes in his innings of 129.

"He is something very special and a very exciting player," Intikhab said after Pakistan's recovery. "He is a very hard working, dedicated young person [and] a very exciting cricketer. We are lucky to have him in the side and I think he's got a great future for Pakistan.

"The good thing is that he never gets under pressure. He played his own natural game [today]. His mother said she would be praying for him and she hoped he would score some runs. She told him to just relax and take it easy but he didn't listen to her."

While 19-year-old Umar was making his first splash in Test cricket, 34-year old Shane Bond was making his comeback after two years of ICL exile and just how much his team missed him was immediately evident. Bowling with the wind, Bond gradually cranked up his pace from 140 kmh to close to 150 and accounted for three top-order batsmen. He ended the day with figures of 4 for 93 and was "pretty happy to come through" after bowling 24 overs in a day.

"My body felt pretty good the whole day and it's always nice to get wickets. I really enjoyed it," Bond said after his performance. "I was pretty keen to try and get that tonight. I'll want the ball first up tomorrow morning to try and finish that off."

Despite his success, Bond was surprised at how flat the University Oval wicket was. "We just had to make a conscious effort to run in hard and bowl aggressively on that wicket. Sometimes you leak a few runs doing that but I think you give yourself the best chance of taking wickets."

New Zealand are ahead by 122 runs with two days to go and Pakistan have only a couple of wickets in hand, a position Bond was happy with. "I think it's important we clean up those wickets tomorrow morning then we've got a good lead hopefully. Then the game is ours to set up. We could still lose the game if we bat poorly but if we play well then we can set the game up and hopefully be the only team that can win it."

Intikhab Alam predicts 'great future' for Umar Akmal


Umar Akmal reaches his hundred, New Zealand v Pakistan, 1st Test, Dunedin, 3rd day, November 26, 2009

Pakistan coach Intikhab Alam has predicted a "great future" in international cricket for debutant Umar Akmal, who rescued his team with a brazen century after the top order had collapsed on the third day in Dunedin. Umar began his innings after Shane Bond and Chris Martin had reduced Pakistan to 85 for 5, trailing by 344 runs in the first innings. He dominated a 176-run partnership with his older brother Kamran and helped Pakistan avoid the follow-on.

Umar has acquired a reputation of being a dasher with a cool head in the limited-overs formats and he began his Test career by cutting Bond for four off his first ball. He raced to his century with three consecutive boundaries off Iain O'Brien, eroding New Zealand's advantage with aggression: Umar hit 21 fours and two sixes in his innings of 129.

"He is something very special and a very exciting player," Intikhab said after Pakistan's recovery. "He is a very hard working, dedicated young person [and] a very exciting cricketer. We are lucky to have him in the side and I think he's got a great future for Pakistan.

"The good thing is that he never gets under pressure. He played his own natural game [today]. His mother said she would be praying for him and she hoped he would score some runs. She told him to just relax and take it easy but he didn't listen to her."

While 19-year-old Umar was making his first splash in Test cricket, 34-year old Shane Bond was making his comeback after two years of ICL exile and just how much his team missed him was immediately evident. Bowling with the wind, Bond gradually cranked up his pace from 140 kmh to close to 150 and accounted for three top-order batsmen. He ended the day with figures of 4 for 93 and was "pretty happy to come through" after bowling 24 overs in a day.

"My body felt pretty good the whole day and it's always nice to get wickets. I really enjoyed it," Bond said after his performance. "I was pretty keen to try and get that tonight. I'll want the ball first up tomorrow morning to try and finish that off."

Despite his success, Bond was surprised at how flat the University Oval wicket was. "We just had to make a conscious effort to run in hard and bowl aggressively on that wicket. Sometimes you leak a few runs doing that but I think you give yourself the best chance of taking wickets."

New Zealand are ahead by 122 runs with two days to go and Pakistan have only a couple of wickets in hand, a position Bond was happy with. "I think it's important we clean up those wickets tomorrow morning then we've got a good lead hopefully. Then the game is ours to set up. We could still lose the game if we bat poorly but if we play well then we can set the game up and hopefully be the only team that can win it."

Sreesanth puts India in sight second-Test victory over Sri Lanka

Sreesanth puts India in sight of comprehensive second-Test victory over Sri Lanka

An excellent bowling performance from Shanthakumaran Sreesanth on day three put India in sight of a comprehensive victory in the second Test against Sri Lanka in Kanpur.

Sreesanth, playing his first Test since April last year, claimed five first innings wickets as Sri Lanka were skittled for a meagre 229 in response to India's first innings total of 642.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni then chose to enforce the follow-on and Sreesanth again provided the breakthrough by dismissing the dangerous Tillakaratne Dilshan (11) as India tightened the noose.

The home side then picked up the wickets of Tharanga Paranavitana, Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jayawardene cheaply as Sri Lanka ended the third day on 57 for four, still 356 behind India's first innings score.

Virender Sehwag, bowling his off-spinners for the first time in this match in the final session, sent back Paranavitana, while Mahela Jayawardene was run out, responding to a poor call from Sangakkara.

Sangakkara was then bowled by Harbhajan Singh via an inside edge as Sri Lanka collapsed to 54 for four.

Angelo Mathews (two not out) and Thilan Samaraweera (one not out) were at the crease when stumps were drawn.

The toast of the day, however, was Sreesanth as he made a triumphant return to international cricket.

The temperamental fast bowler was playing his first match since the Test against South Africa at this very venue, the 18-month interval spent recovering from injury.

The 26-year-old had produced the first breakthrough in the morning by snaring Paranavitana, the opener adding only eight to his overnight score of 30.

Paranavitana, troubled by Sreesanth from the start, edged an out-swinger and Dhoni threw himself to his left to hold a good catch in front of first slip.

Pace spearhead Zaheer Khan had looked off-colour all day and was warned in the morning for running on the pitch.

The left-arm seamer's lack of form played nicely into Sreesanth's hands as he bowled unchanged in an extended spell of nine overs, responding brilliantly to the heavy workload.

He bowled Sangakkara (44) via an inside edge as the batsman got down on one knee to drive and removed Samaraweera in similar fashion.

Minutes before the lunch interval, Harbhajan had caused further damage by bowling Mathews with one the turned just enough to beat the bat and clip the bails.

Sri Lanka had slipped to 138 for five at the lunch interval, but Mahela Jayawardene (47) and Prasanna Jayawardene (39) came together to offer a semblance of resistance.

The former captain, however, was fortunate to have stayed that long as Sreesanth had found the edge on the first delivery he faced, the ball safely falling between Dhoni and Sachin Tendulkar at first slip, the two fielders helplessly watching each other.

Rahul Dravid then grassed another catch at first slip when the batsman was on 25, this time Harbhajan the unfortunate bowler.

The two Jayawardenes held firm in the first hour after lunch and in the process added 60 for the sixth wicket - Sri Lanka's only substantial stand after the 82 between the second wicket pair.

But Sreesanth returned to sever that stand, snaring Prasanna Jayawardene in the second over of his afternoon spell.

Sreesanth had fired the delivery well wide of the off stump and the wicketkeeper batsman slashed at it, only to feather a top edge to Dhoni.

Debutant left-arm spinner Pragyan Ojha, who had kept a tight leash on Sri Lanka in the morning, was then rewarded with his first Test victim - Mahela Jayawardene.

The former captain had played patiently until he decided to come down the track to hit Ojha over the top, only to pick out Tendulkar at mid-on.

Sri Lanka's innings then unravelled quickly, with Sreesanth pegging back Rangana Herath's off stump for his fifth wicket - only his second five-wicket haul in Tests.

Ojha trapped Muttiah Muralitharan in front to finish with two for 37 from 23 overs, while Harbhajan claimed the last wicket of Chanaka Welegedara to also finish with two wickets from the first innings.

Sreesanth puts India in sight second-Test victory over Sri Lanka

Sreesanth puts India in sight of comprehensive second-Test victory over Sri Lanka

An excellent bowling performance from Shanthakumaran Sreesanth on day three put India in sight of a comprehensive victory in the second Test against Sri Lanka in Kanpur.

Sreesanth, playing his first Test since April last year, claimed five first innings wickets as Sri Lanka were skittled for a meagre 229 in response to India's first innings total of 642.

Mahendra Singh Dhoni then chose to enforce the follow-on and Sreesanth again provided the breakthrough by dismissing the dangerous Tillakaratne Dilshan (11) as India tightened the noose.

The home side then picked up the wickets of Tharanga Paranavitana, Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jayawardene cheaply as Sri Lanka ended the third day on 57 for four, still 356 behind India's first innings score.

Virender Sehwag, bowling his off-spinners for the first time in this match in the final session, sent back Paranavitana, while Mahela Jayawardene was run out, responding to a poor call from Sangakkara.

Sangakkara was then bowled by Harbhajan Singh via an inside edge as Sri Lanka collapsed to 54 for four.

Angelo Mathews (two not out) and Thilan Samaraweera (one not out) were at the crease when stumps were drawn.

The toast of the day, however, was Sreesanth as he made a triumphant return to international cricket.

The temperamental fast bowler was playing his first match since the Test against South Africa at this very venue, the 18-month interval spent recovering from injury.

The 26-year-old had produced the first breakthrough in the morning by snaring Paranavitana, the opener adding only eight to his overnight score of 30.

Paranavitana, troubled by Sreesanth from the start, edged an out-swinger and Dhoni threw himself to his left to hold a good catch in front of first slip.

Pace spearhead Zaheer Khan had looked off-colour all day and was warned in the morning for running on the pitch.

The left-arm seamer's lack of form played nicely into Sreesanth's hands as he bowled unchanged in an extended spell of nine overs, responding brilliantly to the heavy workload.

He bowled Sangakkara (44) via an inside edge as the batsman got down on one knee to drive and removed Samaraweera in similar fashion.

Minutes before the lunch interval, Harbhajan had caused further damage by bowling Mathews with one the turned just enough to beat the bat and clip the bails.

Sri Lanka had slipped to 138 for five at the lunch interval, but Mahela Jayawardene (47) and Prasanna Jayawardene (39) came together to offer a semblance of resistance.

The former captain, however, was fortunate to have stayed that long as Sreesanth had found the edge on the first delivery he faced, the ball safely falling between Dhoni and Sachin Tendulkar at first slip, the two fielders helplessly watching each other.

Rahul Dravid then grassed another catch at first slip when the batsman was on 25, this time Harbhajan the unfortunate bowler.

The two Jayawardenes held firm in the first hour after lunch and in the process added 60 for the sixth wicket - Sri Lanka's only substantial stand after the 82 between the second wicket pair.

But Sreesanth returned to sever that stand, snaring Prasanna Jayawardene in the second over of his afternoon spell.

Sreesanth had fired the delivery well wide of the off stump and the wicketkeeper batsman slashed at it, only to feather a top edge to Dhoni.

Debutant left-arm spinner Pragyan Ojha, who had kept a tight leash on Sri Lanka in the morning, was then rewarded with his first Test victim - Mahela Jayawardene.

The former captain had played patiently until he decided to come down the track to hit Ojha over the top, only to pick out Tendulkar at mid-on.

Sri Lanka's innings then unravelled quickly, with Sreesanth pegging back Rangana Herath's off stump for his fifth wicket - only his second five-wicket haul in Tests.

Ojha trapped Muttiah Muralitharan in front to finish with two for 37 from 23 overs, while Harbhajan claimed the last wicket of Chanaka Welegedara to also finish with two wickets from the first innings.

Broad boost for England

http://pragmaticideas.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/england.jpg

The Nottinghamshire seamer has been struggling with a shoulder injury but has been cleared to play at Newlands.

"It's a huge boost," said captain Andrew Strauss. "He's been chomping on the bit to get out on the park for a couple of weeks now - and the minor niggle he had has proved quite persistent. But he seems 100% fit now - which is great."

Broad was injured in the field during England's opening tour match in Bloemfontein at the start of this month and has been on the sidelines for almost three weeks. Strauss observed: "He gives us other options with the new ball, and we're really looking forward to having him back.

"I think he can have a big part to play throughout the course of this tour."

But off-spinner Graeme Swann is still doubtful with a side injury which ruled him out of the seven-wicket win at Centurion on Sunday.

"We probably just need to see how he [Swann] pulls up today," Strauss added.

"Yesterday was the first time he has bowled, so we'll have to take a view tomorrow to see whether he is fit."

South Africa, meanwhile, may make just one change to the side defeated at Centurion.

Fast bowler Wayne Parnell hopes to be fit again after an ankle niggle and could replace all-rounder Albie Morkel.

Broad boost for England

http://pragmaticideas.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/england.jpg

The Nottinghamshire seamer has been struggling with a shoulder injury but has been cleared to play at Newlands.

"It's a huge boost," said captain Andrew Strauss. "He's been chomping on the bit to get out on the park for a couple of weeks now - and the minor niggle he had has proved quite persistent. But he seems 100% fit now - which is great."

Broad was injured in the field during England's opening tour match in Bloemfontein at the start of this month and has been on the sidelines for almost three weeks. Strauss observed: "He gives us other options with the new ball, and we're really looking forward to having him back.

"I think he can have a big part to play throughout the course of this tour."

But off-spinner Graeme Swann is still doubtful with a side injury which ruled him out of the seven-wicket win at Centurion on Sunday.

"We probably just need to see how he [Swann] pulls up today," Strauss added.

"Yesterday was the first time he has bowled, so we'll have to take a view tomorrow to see whether he is fit."

South Africa, meanwhile, may make just one change to the side defeated at Centurion.

Fast bowler Wayne Parnell hopes to be fit again after an ankle niggle and could replace all-rounder Albie Morkel.

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Little support for Gayle's men

THE ramshackle West Indies taking the Gabba field for today's first Test are the biggest outsiders sent from the Caribbean in cricket's history - and still nobody will back them. Which is probably not surprising given their captain believes Test cricket is dying.

A crowd of no more than 15,000 is expected to show up in Brisbane for day one. Ask Windies captain Chris Gayle if he still believes Test cricket is terminal and there is no spin. ''You look at what is happening now, it is no secret,'' said Gayle, who caused a storm this year by forecasting the end of Test cricket and adding that it ''wouldn't be so sad''.

''But at the same time we have always got to be committed to whatever cricket we play. I can't come and say Test cricket is going to die and then basically it just will happen just like that. It's just how things have been progressing for the last couple of months. Spectators haven't turned out so they are more drawn to the coloured clothing at this point in time.''

Gayle's ''I told you so'' assessment of the game is not helped by his side's ludicrous odds in a two-team contest - bookmakers predict the Windies will be paying up to $18 for the win by the toss. ''That is just unheard of,'' Centrebet's Neil Evans said. ''Not between two historically steep nations.''

Most money has come for a finish inside three days. It is a grave time for Caribbean cricket and the game as a whole. Unless there is a spirited display from Gayle's men, cricket could well lose history's greatest entertainers from the five-day format.

''We want to perform,'' Gayle said.

''Once we perform then we will actually get the support and the crowds back in the stands. We just have to wait and assess what will happen in this series and see how well we can go up against Australia.

''Definitely Caribbean people still have the passion for whatever cricket we play out there and they are very supportive when we go out there and get the job done. Sometimes when these things don't happen, we get beaten and cursed but that is part of the game.

''We are just trying to play our part and give the fans something to cheer about.''

With a mere 7 per cent of surveyed Indian fans listing Test cricket as their favourite format recently, the red-ball game has never been under a greater threat.

Ideas of a Test championship gain momentum, along with split Test divisions that would relegate the Windies to second-tier status.

The hierarchy was divided over an industrial dispute, leading top stars including Gayle to strike and miss important tournaments, and now they will field a team made up of strikers and those who stepped in for them.

Australian captain Ricky Ponting is resigned to playing his first Test match since the Ashes in a largely empty stadium.

''There's not much we can do. We can only go out and play the best cricket we can and make it as entertaining as possible for everyone there,'' he said.

And not only does the state of the opposition worry him, but also the state of pitches around the world.

There has long been speculation domestic organisations purposely flatten out wickets in order to get five days of play and five days of gate receipts. Whatever the reason pitches have become so lifeless, Ponting said Tests were losing their snap because of it.

''I think it is one of the big reasons around the world why people aren't turning up to watch Test cricket,'' he said. ''When it was at its most exciting, it was about three or four fast bowlers and lots of bouncers and hook shots. The hostility between bat and ball was one of the most attractive things about Test cricket.

''Quite often now a lot of the wickets around the world are very similar.

''Scoring rates are high, and probably too high. There is not that real tough contest between fast bowler and batsmen that I would like to see … that has a lot to do with the spectacle of Test cricket.''

The Gabba promises bounce, as usual.

And Gayle promised his commitment to Test cricket: ''Yeah, that's why I come to the press conference in my white clothes.''

Daniel Vettori misses out on century as New Zealand seize advantage

Daniel Vettori fell to an Umar Gul delivery when one run short of his fifth Test century

Daniel Vettori fell one run short of a fifth Test century as rain disrupted the second day of the First Test between New Zealand and Pakistan in Dunedin.

The New Zealand captain, who started the day on 40, had reached 87 when rain delayed play for more than three and a half hours shortly after lunch. When the teams returned at 6.35pm local time, Vettori moved quickly into the 90s with his 13th boundary of the innings coming off an Umar Gul delivery.

But he looked tentative thereafter and was lucky not to go when he edged between the Pakistan wicketkeeper Kamram Akmal and the first slip Imran Farhat in Gul's next over. Gul eventually got his man 10 balls later, enticing the left-hander into a thick edge which Akmal gathered.

It was a disappointing finish for Vettori, who had resurrected his side's hopes. Just one ball after Vettori's dismissal New Zealand were offered the light which they accepted to end the day on 404 for eight, with Shane Bond unbeaten on eight and Iain O'Brien two not out.

Bond survived a referral to the umpire decision review system in the same over Vettori was dismissed when the Pakistan captain Mohammad Yousuf queried Simon Taufel's decision not to give the New Zealand fast bowler out lbw. Vettori's dismissal was Gul's second scalp of the day after his yorker removed Brendon McCullum's middle stump on the stroke of lunch to leave New Zealand at 375 for seven.

Gul's two wickets were just reward after a luckless opening day which saw him bowl seven maidens in 21 overs at the cost of 78 runs. He finished the second day with figures of two for 113 off 34 overs, including 10 maidens.

McCullum had added 53 to his overnight score by the time he was dislodged as he and Vettori frustrated the Pakistan bowlers in a dogged seventh-wicket stand of 164. Both batsmen battled through a hostile early spell from Mohammed Asif and Mohammad Aamer, who peppered them with short-pitched deliveries.

Vettori, who is managing a left shoulder problem, was hit in that area by Asif while McCullum was struck flush on the helmet by an Aamer delivery and required a brief medical check-up.

Having withstood the onslaught, Vettori notched a rapid 21st Test fifty from 63 balls. McCullum claimed a 14th fifty from 98 deliveries and the pair continued to punish the frustrated Pakistan attack until Gul got the breakthrough the ball before lunch.

Only 14 minutes were possible after the interval before the rain arrived with the Black Caps having added just six runs to the total. Three hours and 40 minutes later Vettori and Bond returned to the crease and battled through five tough overs in drizzle and fading light before Gul finally took Vettori's wicket.

McCullum said afterwards that the onus is on New Zealand's bowlers to press home the advantage earned by their batsmen. "There are still three days to go in the game and we've got a good, sizeable first-innings total so if we bowl well then hopefully we'll give ourselves a real opportunity," he said. "The wicket is pretty good but it certainly does have a little bit in it if you bend your back.

"We've obviously got to strike them pretty early to give ourselves a real strong chance but we've got the bowlers to do it so I think we can."

Daniel Vettori misses out on century as New Zealand seize advantage

Daniel Vettori fell to an Umar Gul delivery when one run short of his fifth Test century

Daniel Vettori fell one run short of a fifth Test century as rain disrupted the second day of the First Test between New Zealand and Pakistan in Dunedin.

The New Zealand captain, who started the day on 40, had reached 87 when rain delayed play for more than three and a half hours shortly after lunch. When the teams returned at 6.35pm local time, Vettori moved quickly into the 90s with his 13th boundary of the innings coming off an Umar Gul delivery.

But he looked tentative thereafter and was lucky not to go when he edged between the Pakistan wicketkeeper Kamram Akmal and the first slip Imran Farhat in Gul's next over. Gul eventually got his man 10 balls later, enticing the left-hander into a thick edge which Akmal gathered.

It was a disappointing finish for Vettori, who had resurrected his side's hopes. Just one ball after Vettori's dismissal New Zealand were offered the light which they accepted to end the day on 404 for eight, with Shane Bond unbeaten on eight and Iain O'Brien two not out.

Bond survived a referral to the umpire decision review system in the same over Vettori was dismissed when the Pakistan captain Mohammad Yousuf queried Simon Taufel's decision not to give the New Zealand fast bowler out lbw. Vettori's dismissal was Gul's second scalp of the day after his yorker removed Brendon McCullum's middle stump on the stroke of lunch to leave New Zealand at 375 for seven.

Gul's two wickets were just reward after a luckless opening day which saw him bowl seven maidens in 21 overs at the cost of 78 runs. He finished the second day with figures of two for 113 off 34 overs, including 10 maidens.

McCullum had added 53 to his overnight score by the time he was dislodged as he and Vettori frustrated the Pakistan bowlers in a dogged seventh-wicket stand of 164. Both batsmen battled through a hostile early spell from Mohammed Asif and Mohammad Aamer, who peppered them with short-pitched deliveries.

Vettori, who is managing a left shoulder problem, was hit in that area by Asif while McCullum was struck flush on the helmet by an Aamer delivery and required a brief medical check-up.

Having withstood the onslaught, Vettori notched a rapid 21st Test fifty from 63 balls. McCullum claimed a 14th fifty from 98 deliveries and the pair continued to punish the frustrated Pakistan attack until Gul got the breakthrough the ball before lunch.

Only 14 minutes were possible after the interval before the rain arrived with the Black Caps having added just six runs to the total. Three hours and 40 minutes later Vettori and Bond returned to the crease and battled through five tough overs in drizzle and fading light before Gul finally took Vettori's wicket.

McCullum said afterwards that the onus is on New Zealand's bowlers to press home the advantage earned by their batsmen. "There are still three days to go in the game and we've got a good, sizeable first-innings total so if we bowl well then hopefully we'll give ourselves a real opportunity," he said. "The wicket is pretty good but it certainly does have a little bit in it if you bend your back.

"We've obviously got to strike them pretty early to give ourselves a real strong chance but we've got the bowlers to do it so I think we can."

India seize initiative in second Sri Lanka Test after Raul Dravid century

India seize initiative in second Sri Lanka Test after Raul Dravid century

Rahul Dravid struck his 28th century and Zaheer Khan followed up with a first ball wicket as India tightened their grip on the second Test against Sri Lanka in Kanpur.

Dravid smashed 15 fours and a six in his 144-run knock to guide India to an imposing 642 in their first innings, while Yuvraj Singh and Venkatsai Laxman also joined in the run-fest with half-centuries.

In reply, Sri Lanka had reached 66-1 by close on the second day, trailing India by 576 runs with nine wickets in hand.

Tharanga Paranavitana and captain Kumar Sangakkara were both unbeaten on 30 when stumps were drawn for the day.

Sri Lanka’s innings began on a shaky note with in-form opener Tillakaratne Dilshan edging left-arm fast bowler Zaheer to be caught by debutant Pragyan Ojha at mid-on. But Paranavitana and Sangakkara saw off some spirited bowling by India in fading light to ensure no further setbacks.

Left-arm spinner Rangana Herath took 5-121 to help Sri Lanka bowl out India shortly after tea but by then the hosts had ensured a huge first-innings total.

Laxman (63) hit five fours on the way to his 41st Test half-century while Yuvraj cracked four boundaries and two sixes in his 67-run knock to enthral a strong 25,000 crowd at the Green Park stadium. The pair also shared 102 runs for the fifth wicket before Laxman was caught by Dilshan off Herath.

Herath struck again twice, bowling Indian captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Harbhajan Singh through the gate to bring some cheer to the Sri Lankan camp in the post-lunch session.

Dravid, who scored 177 in the drawn first Test at Ahmedabad, shared 94 runs for the third wicket with Sachin Tendulkar (40) to build on India’s overnight score of 417-2. He was the third Indian batsman to score a century after Gautam Gambhir (167) and Virender Sehwag (131) put on 233 runs for the opening wicket to lay the platform for a huge first innings total.

“We are very satisfied with our total,” said Gambhir. “The ball is turning so it will be difficult for Sri Lanka to score runs. We will have to bowl well in the right areas and put pressure on them.

“We are confident because only one team can lose in this situation and that is Sri Lanka.”

Dravid reached three figures with an elegantly-driven four off paceman Chanaka Welegedara to the mid-off boundary. The batsman is now ninth in the list of all-time century makers, surpassing Australia’s retired captain Allan Border and Sri Lankan Mahela Jayawardene, who both have 27 centuries against their names.

Dravid also overtook Border (11,174) to become the fourth highest Test scorer with 11,267 runs behind Tendulkar, West Indies’ Brian Lara and Australian skipper Ricky Ponting.

Sri Lanka, seeking their first-ever win on Indian soil, tasted success early in the morning session when Mendis foxed Tendulkar. Tendulkar, dropped on 30 by Dilshan, lofted Mendis for a six but fell in the same over by holing out to Thilan Samaraweera at mid-off.

Dravid was run out in a bizarre fashion, with Herath managing to hit the stumps at the non-striker’s end after deflecting a sharp drive from Laxman.

India seize initiative in second Sri Lanka Test after Raul Dravid century

India seize initiative in second Sri Lanka Test after Raul Dravid century

Rahul Dravid struck his 28th century and Zaheer Khan followed up with a first ball wicket as India tightened their grip on the second Test against Sri Lanka in Kanpur.

Dravid smashed 15 fours and a six in his 144-run knock to guide India to an imposing 642 in their first innings, while Yuvraj Singh and Venkatsai Laxman also joined in the run-fest with half-centuries.

In reply, Sri Lanka had reached 66-1 by close on the second day, trailing India by 576 runs with nine wickets in hand.

Tharanga Paranavitana and captain Kumar Sangakkara were both unbeaten on 30 when stumps were drawn for the day.

Sri Lanka’s innings began on a shaky note with in-form opener Tillakaratne Dilshan edging left-arm fast bowler Zaheer to be caught by debutant Pragyan Ojha at mid-on. But Paranavitana and Sangakkara saw off some spirited bowling by India in fading light to ensure no further setbacks.

Left-arm spinner Rangana Herath took 5-121 to help Sri Lanka bowl out India shortly after tea but by then the hosts had ensured a huge first-innings total.

Laxman (63) hit five fours on the way to his 41st Test half-century while Yuvraj cracked four boundaries and two sixes in his 67-run knock to enthral a strong 25,000 crowd at the Green Park stadium. The pair also shared 102 runs for the fifth wicket before Laxman was caught by Dilshan off Herath.

Herath struck again twice, bowling Indian captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Harbhajan Singh through the gate to bring some cheer to the Sri Lankan camp in the post-lunch session.

Dravid, who scored 177 in the drawn first Test at Ahmedabad, shared 94 runs for the third wicket with Sachin Tendulkar (40) to build on India’s overnight score of 417-2. He was the third Indian batsman to score a century after Gautam Gambhir (167) and Virender Sehwag (131) put on 233 runs for the opening wicket to lay the platform for a huge first innings total.

“We are very satisfied with our total,” said Gambhir. “The ball is turning so it will be difficult for Sri Lanka to score runs. We will have to bowl well in the right areas and put pressure on them.

“We are confident because only one team can lose in this situation and that is Sri Lanka.”

Dravid reached three figures with an elegantly-driven four off paceman Chanaka Welegedara to the mid-off boundary. The batsman is now ninth in the list of all-time century makers, surpassing Australia’s retired captain Allan Border and Sri Lankan Mahela Jayawardene, who both have 27 centuries against their names.

Dravid also overtook Border (11,174) to become the fourth highest Test scorer with 11,267 runs behind Tendulkar, West Indies’ Brian Lara and Australian skipper Ricky Ponting.

Sri Lanka, seeking their first-ever win on Indian soil, tasted success early in the morning session when Mendis foxed Tendulkar. Tendulkar, dropped on 30 by Dilshan, lofted Mendis for a six but fell in the same over by holing out to Thilan Samaraweera at mid-off.

Dravid was run out in a bizarre fashion, with Herath managing to hit the stumps at the non-striker’s end after deflecting a sharp drive from Laxman.

Ashish Nehra gets retainer contract

Ashish Nehra sends Darren Sammy on his way, India v West Indies, Champions Trophy, Group A, Johannesburg, September 30, 2009
indian fast bowler Ashish Nehra has been given a retainer contract by the BCCI for 2009-10, capping a remarkable comeback from injury this year.

Nehra replaced allrounder Irfan Pathan in the Grade B list for an annual central contract worth Rs 40 lakh. Irfan's name was missing altogether from the initial list of contracted players issued by the BCCI, but was included later in the day in Grade C with the board saying he'd been "erroneously" left out.

Praveen Kumar and Dinesh Karthik were the others to benefit, both moving up a grade. Karthik is now in Grade C (Rs 25 lakh) while Praveen moves up to Grade B.

Irfan apart, the players demoted include S Badrinath, who slipped to Group C from B last year, and Piyush Chawla, who has moved one step down to D. There were four new entries in India's latest retainer list - Abhishek Nayar, Dhawal Kulkarni, Ajinkya Rahane and Manoj Tiwary.

Sachin Tendulkar, MS Dhoni, Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Rahul Dravid, VVS Laxman, Yuvraj Singh, Zaheer Khan, Harbhajan Singh.

Ashish Nehra gets retainer contract

Ashish Nehra sends Darren Sammy on his way, India v West Indies, Champions Trophy, Group A, Johannesburg, September 30, 2009
indian fast bowler Ashish Nehra has been given a retainer contract by the BCCI for 2009-10, capping a remarkable comeback from injury this year.

Nehra replaced allrounder Irfan Pathan in the Grade B list for an annual central contract worth Rs 40 lakh. Irfan's name was missing altogether from the initial list of contracted players issued by the BCCI, but was included later in the day in Grade C with the board saying he'd been "erroneously" left out.

Praveen Kumar and Dinesh Karthik were the others to benefit, both moving up a grade. Karthik is now in Grade C (Rs 25 lakh) while Praveen moves up to Grade B.

Irfan apart, the players demoted include S Badrinath, who slipped to Group C from B last year, and Piyush Chawla, who has moved one step down to D. There were four new entries in India's latest retainer list - Abhishek Nayar, Dhawal Kulkarni, Ajinkya Rahane and Manoj Tiwary.

Sachin Tendulkar, MS Dhoni, Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Rahul Dravid, VVS Laxman, Yuvraj Singh, Zaheer Khan, Harbhajan Singh.

IPL biggest threat to international cricket: Australian fans

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20091125/capt.9e11b433b3cd4eb7b16a1f2a00b565ae.india_sri_lanka_cricket_del145.jpg

Australian cricket fans are worried that the billion-dollar Indian Premier League (IPL) will emerge as the biggest threat to the health of international cricket in the near future.

Participating in a survey, they surprisingly also supported the one-day international format, but were against Twenty20 cricket taking over, reports the Daily Telegraph.

The fans also branded Michael Clarke Australia's most overrated player and called for national selection chairman Andrew Hilditch to be sacked.

The Daily Telegraph survey of more than 3500 people shows that fans are not sold on the flashy vice-captain, despite his performance in the Ashes, when he was the top run scorer with 448 at 64.

73% of them said Australia's controversial chairman of selectors Hilditch should be shown the door.

Most said Hilditch has made some bewildering decisions, and only a mere 17% believed he should stay in the job.

Coach Tim Nielsen also copped a spray from fans with less than half sure that he is the right man for generational change.

IPL biggest threat to international cricket: Australian fans

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20091125/capt.9e11b433b3cd4eb7b16a1f2a00b565ae.india_sri_lanka_cricket_del145.jpg

Australian cricket fans are worried that the billion-dollar Indian Premier League (IPL) will emerge as the biggest threat to the health of international cricket in the near future.

Participating in a survey, they surprisingly also supported the one-day international format, but were against Twenty20 cricket taking over, reports the Daily Telegraph.

The fans also branded Michael Clarke Australia's most overrated player and called for national selection chairman Andrew Hilditch to be sacked.

The Daily Telegraph survey of more than 3500 people shows that fans are not sold on the flashy vice-captain, despite his performance in the Ashes, when he was the top run scorer with 448 at 64.

73% of them said Australia's controversial chairman of selectors Hilditch should be shown the door.

Most said Hilditch has made some bewildering decisions, and only a mere 17% believed he should stay in the job.

Coach Tim Nielsen also copped a spray from fans with less than half sure that he is the right man for generational change.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Cricket Games of 2009

Gaming in cricket has emerged in the year 2009 as new cricket games have been developed and the older ones have developed new versions with new features. Codemasters released Ashes 2009 during Ashes series with improved bowling. Cricket revolution released recently can provide better options for batting and bowling. Multi-player as well as Online cricket games has been developed in 2009.

Ashes 2009:
Ashes 2009 - game
Ashes 2009 - game

This game featured licensed teams and players from Ashes 2009. With T20, test and ODI as three modes, it has superb gameplay. Commentary from legends like Shane Warne and Ian Botham is another great feature in this game. Batting can be entertaining but like other cricket games, no one wants to bowl in this game. Practicing under nets with commentary is a great feature.

Cricket Revolution :
Cricket revolution
Cricket revolution

The game by Pakistani gaming company Mindstorm studios has certainly shown many possibilities for the development of cricket game. Playing the game online with other competitors is really exciting feature. Batting has been developed offering about 38 shots for a batsman. AI is quite impressive. It has tried to revolutionize bowling with addition of special deliveries but still bowling is not much exciting. No commentary in the game as well as no option for skipping overs is negative point for the game.

International cricket captain 2009 (ICC 2009) :
International cricket captain 2009

International cricket captain 2009
With licensed players, teams and a collection of real cricket statistics makes this cricket management game exciting. It is a cricket game where you are the captain who selects the squads, trains the team, make batting or bowling changes, chooses to bat aggressive, normal or defensive, changes the field position and does every work which a real captain, coach, physio and selector do. If you love watching cricket, you will certainly love this game.

Cricket coach 2009 :

Cricket coach 2009
A cricket management game similar to ICC 2009 somewhat supressed the dominance of Cricket captain in management games. It included licensed players from domestic teams and is regarded as many users as more realistic. Unlike ICC 2009, it didn't feature 3D highlights.

Howzat - online cricket game : A flash based online cricket game is now in its beta version. It features real teams and players. Its a online cricket game and two users connected in the internet battle in this match. As there is no option for playing against computer, sometimes its boring to find no one available to play against us. The best thing about it is that its free and loads fast and can even compete with other top games.

Cricket Games of 2009

Gaming in cricket has emerged in the year 2009 as new cricket games have been developed and the older ones have developed new versions with new features. Codemasters released Ashes 2009 during Ashes series with improved bowling. Cricket revolution released recently can provide better options for batting and bowling. Multi-player as well as Online cricket games has been developed in 2009.

Ashes 2009:
Ashes 2009 - game
Ashes 2009 - game

This game featured licensed teams and players from Ashes 2009. With T20, test and ODI as three modes, it has superb gameplay. Commentary from legends like Shane Warne and Ian Botham is another great feature in this game. Batting can be entertaining but like other cricket games, no one wants to bowl in this game. Practicing under nets with commentary is a great feature.

Cricket Revolution :
Cricket revolution
Cricket revolution

The game by Pakistani gaming company Mindstorm studios has certainly shown many possibilities for the development of cricket game. Playing the game online with other competitors is really exciting feature. Batting has been developed offering about 38 shots for a batsman. AI is quite impressive. It has tried to revolutionize bowling with addition of special deliveries but still bowling is not much exciting. No commentary in the game as well as no option for skipping overs is negative point for the game.

International cricket captain 2009 (ICC 2009) :
International cricket captain 2009

International cricket captain 2009
With licensed players, teams and a collection of real cricket statistics makes this cricket management game exciting. It is a cricket game where you are the captain who selects the squads, trains the team, make batting or bowling changes, chooses to bat aggressive, normal or defensive, changes the field position and does every work which a real captain, coach, physio and selector do. If you love watching cricket, you will certainly love this game.

Cricket coach 2009 :

Cricket coach 2009
A cricket management game similar to ICC 2009 somewhat supressed the dominance of Cricket captain in management games. It included licensed players from domestic teams and is regarded as many users as more realistic. Unlike ICC 2009, it didn't feature 3D highlights.

Howzat - online cricket game : A flash based online cricket game is now in its beta version. It features real teams and players. Its a online cricket game and two users connected in the internet battle in this match. As there is no option for playing against computer, sometimes its boring to find no one available to play against us. The best thing about it is that its free and loads fast and can even compete with other top games.