Pepsi IPL 2015 Logo

The 2015 season of the Indian Premier League (abbreviated as IPL 8 or Pepsi IPL 2015) is the eighth season of the IPL. Kolkata Knight Riders are the defending champions having won the title in the 2014 season. The complete tournament is expected to be held across different cities in India unlike the previous season. The tournament was started on Wednesday, 8 April 2015 after the end of the 2015 Cricket World Cup. A total of 60 T20 matches will be held in the entire tournament. No matches will be held in Kolkata between April 12 and April 25 due to Municipal Elections.

Franchises retained 123 players 8th IPL season before moving into auction. The released players provided an option to register themselves for auction. 6 Players were transferred across teams before the auction took place. In the Pepsi IPL 2015 auction held on February 16 at Bangalore, Yuvraj Singh was sold to Delhi Daredevils for 16 crores INR, for a record bid in IPL auction history. A total of 67 players were sold out in the auction and all franchises spent total of 87.60 Crores to buy players.

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Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Cairns feel proud to what he achive to cricket

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01112/cairns_1112873c.jpg

Chris Cairns has told Cricinfo of his "distress" at reported claims by IPL commissioner Lalit Modi that he had been barred from the tournament because of what was alleged on Modi's Twitter post to be "his past record in match-fixing" and explained why he has decided to take the matter to court.

"Lalit Modi is … possibly the most powerful man in world cricket today," Cairns said." I couldn't believe what he'd said. My initial reaction of shock turned into outrage. I'm proud of what I have achieved in cricket and I am not going to have Modi or anyone else destroy that."

Cairns is anything but naïve and admits he is aware of murmurings that have been circulating ever since he left the rebel ICL tournament in 2008. "Certain news agencies ran scandalous, rumour-based articles claiming that unsubstantiated allegations of match fixing were the reason for my contract being terminated. These rumours were nothing much more than "pub talk". But they needed to be nipped in the bud, so my lawyer and I denied them at the time, and not another word was heard on the subject.

"There is not any truth in any suggestion I have ever been associated with any type of match-fixing."

Officially, Cairns' contract was cancelled because of fitness issues and he agrees that he was at fault in that he had "failed to turn up properly fit for their tournament".

"I'd completed a five-week, 1000km walk from Auckland to Christchurch for my charity Foundation in NZ in August and September of 2008, just two weeks prior to our assembly for the ICL tournament. My knees were particularly damaged but it was my left ankle which gave me most trouble and meant my cricketing performance was hampered. While I indicated to ICL at the time of my dismissal that I was unhappy with their decision, I understood and respected that their main priority was to have a reputable competition. Subsequently I went back home in December 2008 and had an operation on my left ankle because I knew I had to get it fixed if I wanted to try and regain my ICL contract."

But with the ICL now moribund, Cairns who has not played since, says he was genuinely excited when Sundar Raman, the chief executive of the IPL, suggested via a third party that he should put his name forward for the 2010 auction

"He enquired about my wellbeing and possible interest in putting my name forward for this January's auction and I was keen to do so. It was the IPL who asked me to play in their competition. Emails between Raman and myself followed and all was put in place in late December for my name to go on the initial list of 97 players available to be chosen for the final auction. I received details about the process from the IPL lawyers at IMG. Modi was copied in on these emails, so he was fully aware of my involvement.

"Lalit Modi says that it is the IPL who invites players to put their names forward, and it is the IPL who can withdraw the invitation. I agree. My participation in the 2010 IPL is at the league's discretion and it was their entitlement to choose whom they wish. But for Modi to publicly express such damaging statements without any consultation or verification is incredible. He agrees that being on the IPL shortlist was no guarantee he would be picked, although he says he knows of at least one franchise who were interested. "I could have had one last hoorah on the cricketing fields of India. That hope was extinguished with a sledgehammer." According to Cairns in the days that followed the MCC withdrew an invitation for him to tour the UAE with them later this month.

Source : Cricinfo

Cairns feel proud to what he achive to cricket

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01112/cairns_1112873c.jpg

Chris Cairns has told Cricinfo of his "distress" at reported claims by IPL commissioner Lalit Modi that he had been barred from the tournament because of what was alleged on Modi's Twitter post to be "his past record in match-fixing" and explained why he has decided to take the matter to court.

"Lalit Modi is … possibly the most powerful man in world cricket today," Cairns said." I couldn't believe what he'd said. My initial reaction of shock turned into outrage. I'm proud of what I have achieved in cricket and I am not going to have Modi or anyone else destroy that."

Cairns is anything but naïve and admits he is aware of murmurings that have been circulating ever since he left the rebel ICL tournament in 2008. "Certain news agencies ran scandalous, rumour-based articles claiming that unsubstantiated allegations of match fixing were the reason for my contract being terminated. These rumours were nothing much more than "pub talk". But they needed to be nipped in the bud, so my lawyer and I denied them at the time, and not another word was heard on the subject.

"There is not any truth in any suggestion I have ever been associated with any type of match-fixing."

Officially, Cairns' contract was cancelled because of fitness issues and he agrees that he was at fault in that he had "failed to turn up properly fit for their tournament".

"I'd completed a five-week, 1000km walk from Auckland to Christchurch for my charity Foundation in NZ in August and September of 2008, just two weeks prior to our assembly for the ICL tournament. My knees were particularly damaged but it was my left ankle which gave me most trouble and meant my cricketing performance was hampered. While I indicated to ICL at the time of my dismissal that I was unhappy with their decision, I understood and respected that their main priority was to have a reputable competition. Subsequently I went back home in December 2008 and had an operation on my left ankle because I knew I had to get it fixed if I wanted to try and regain my ICL contract."

But with the ICL now moribund, Cairns who has not played since, says he was genuinely excited when Sundar Raman, the chief executive of the IPL, suggested via a third party that he should put his name forward for the 2010 auction

"He enquired about my wellbeing and possible interest in putting my name forward for this January's auction and I was keen to do so. It was the IPL who asked me to play in their competition. Emails between Raman and myself followed and all was put in place in late December for my name to go on the initial list of 97 players available to be chosen for the final auction. I received details about the process from the IPL lawyers at IMG. Modi was copied in on these emails, so he was fully aware of my involvement.

"Lalit Modi says that it is the IPL who invites players to put their names forward, and it is the IPL who can withdraw the invitation. I agree. My participation in the 2010 IPL is at the league's discretion and it was their entitlement to choose whom they wish. But for Modi to publicly express such damaging statements without any consultation or verification is incredible. He agrees that being on the IPL shortlist was no guarantee he would be picked, although he says he knows of at least one franchise who were interested. "I could have had one last hoorah on the cricketing fields of India. That hope was extinguished with a sledgehammer." According to Cairns in the days that followed the MCC withdrew an invitation for him to tour the UAE with them later this month.

Source : Cricinfo

is it better IPL gets bigger but ?

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

It would seem that the IPL is getting bigger and with another Rs 3,000 crore being pumped in by way of two new franchises – Kochi and Pune – I do wonder whether there is a recession at all in our country! In difficult times like these when everyone is into cost-cutting, it is mind-boggling that companies can yet fork out such huge amounts just to own a cricket team.

For all that, I am not totally convinced that all the franchises have cricket at heart. I feel, it is more about entering into another business venture. More like a start-up really. I would also like to know the parameters used for evaluation that led to the fixing of the base price of USD 225 million for each of the two new teams.

Daredevils in high spirits despite losses

True, cricket, especially the IPL has garnered impressive eyeballs, footprints, TRPs or whatever, but it is basically region-specific. I can hardly relate to the money considering that cricket is anything but a global sport and still has a long, long way to go to achieve that status. Yet, the IPL has some serious numbers that it can throw at even the EPL or the NBA. For me, it makes no sense and perhaps, I should have a sitting with one of the biz whiz kids to understand!

Consider this – the IPL has generated more money than what the Indian government has spent (and still is spending) on the Commonwealth Games. To top it, the IPL has the potential to get even richer, if not truly global, given the fact that for Lalit Modi, more is less. He has already hinted at taking his circus abroad and that could only mean more franchise teams catering to local interests.

Looking at the direction the IPL is heading in, I would say that the game itself will have to undergo serious modifications or innovations to suit the format. The Mongoose bat is a clear sign of things to come. I had the occasion to have a feel of the bat during its launch in Chennai and frankly, it took me a few swings at an imaginary ball to get the hang of it.

IPL 2010: Full Coverage

Speaking then, Matthew Hayden predicted more innovations in the near future. He cited the changes in the basic equipment such as pads and gloves that are in a constant process of refinement. I am sure that 10 years hence when we look back at the IPL of 2008, we would probably dub it as “amateurish” in content and presentation!

The IPL today borders on the garish and the lavish. There is so much noise and razzmatazz that you have little time to bother about the quality of cricket on display. But then, for most of us, it is a welcome break from our routine – nothing more, nothing less. To an extent, the IPL was forced down our throat and there are no signs yet of an indigestion.

My main fear is for Test cricket that might erode in its relevance, if not significance, over a period of time when future administrators, brought up on a diet of T20 might even question its existence. Young players these days have begun to look at the IPL and not Tests or even ODIs as the ticket to instant fame and fortune.

Facilitating such a process is the enlargement of the IPL. Two additional teams will open the doors of opportunity to at least 60 players. It could also mean dilution in terms of overall quality of cricket. But then, who cares so long as we can have a good laugh? We might end up watching the IPL like we do the nonsensical Bollywood pot-boilers – see it (if you wish
to) and forget it.

Source : Sify

is it better IPL gets bigger but ?

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

It would seem that the IPL is getting bigger and with another Rs 3,000 crore being pumped in by way of two new franchises – Kochi and Pune – I do wonder whether there is a recession at all in our country! In difficult times like these when everyone is into cost-cutting, it is mind-boggling that companies can yet fork out such huge amounts just to own a cricket team.

For all that, I am not totally convinced that all the franchises have cricket at heart. I feel, it is more about entering into another business venture. More like a start-up really. I would also like to know the parameters used for evaluation that led to the fixing of the base price of USD 225 million for each of the two new teams.

Daredevils in high spirits despite losses

True, cricket, especially the IPL has garnered impressive eyeballs, footprints, TRPs or whatever, but it is basically region-specific. I can hardly relate to the money considering that cricket is anything but a global sport and still has a long, long way to go to achieve that status. Yet, the IPL has some serious numbers that it can throw at even the EPL or the NBA. For me, it makes no sense and perhaps, I should have a sitting with one of the biz whiz kids to understand!

Consider this – the IPL has generated more money than what the Indian government has spent (and still is spending) on the Commonwealth Games. To top it, the IPL has the potential to get even richer, if not truly global, given the fact that for Lalit Modi, more is less. He has already hinted at taking his circus abroad and that could only mean more franchise teams catering to local interests.

Looking at the direction the IPL is heading in, I would say that the game itself will have to undergo serious modifications or innovations to suit the format. The Mongoose bat is a clear sign of things to come. I had the occasion to have a feel of the bat during its launch in Chennai and frankly, it took me a few swings at an imaginary ball to get the hang of it.

IPL 2010: Full Coverage

Speaking then, Matthew Hayden predicted more innovations in the near future. He cited the changes in the basic equipment such as pads and gloves that are in a constant process of refinement. I am sure that 10 years hence when we look back at the IPL of 2008, we would probably dub it as “amateurish” in content and presentation!

The IPL today borders on the garish and the lavish. There is so much noise and razzmatazz that you have little time to bother about the quality of cricket on display. But then, for most of us, it is a welcome break from our routine – nothing more, nothing less. To an extent, the IPL was forced down our throat and there are no signs yet of an indigestion.

My main fear is for Test cricket that might erode in its relevance, if not significance, over a period of time when future administrators, brought up on a diet of T20 might even question its existence. Young players these days have begun to look at the IPL and not Tests or even ODIs as the ticket to instant fame and fortune.

Facilitating such a process is the enlargement of the IPL. Two additional teams will open the doors of opportunity to at least 60 players. It could also mean dilution in terms of overall quality of cricket. But then, who cares so long as we can have a good laugh? We might end up watching the IPL like we do the nonsensical Bollywood pot-boilers – see it (if you wish
to) and forget it.

Source : Sify

Tiwary : IPL to domestic cricket You can't compare

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

Mumbai Indians [ Images ] batsman Saurabh Tiwary [ Images ] said a successful run in the Indian Premier League [ Images ] is the best way of getting noticed by the national selectors rather than grinding it out in domestic cricket.

"The IPL is a good platform for us youngsters because if you score runs here then everybody knows that you are a good cricketer because you get a lot of media coverage in this tournament. You cannot compare IPL to domestic cricket because even if you score 20 runs in this tournament, it gets coverage. But in domestic cricket it all depends on the media coverage - if that is good then your performance gets noticed," Tiwary said in Mumbai on Tuesday.

The 20-year-old Jharkhand batsman has been an integral part of Mumbai's smashing start to IPL 3. The left-hander started the tournament with back to back half-centuries for a tally of 169 runs in four matches at a healthy average of 43.

Tiwary's attacking approach has impressed even captain Sachin Tendulkar [ Images ], who has preferred to send him ahead of West Indian stars Dwayne Bravo [ Images ] and Kieron Pollard in the middle-order.

"It feels good when a captain shows confidence in your abilities and sends you ahead of the senior players," said a delighted Tiwary.

Hailing from India captain Mahindra Singh Dhoni's [ Images ] state, Tiwary also looks very much like the Indian captain at the start of his international career with his long flowing locks and stocky body. He rues at not having played enough cricket with Dhoni in domestic cricket.

"I have not played much cricket with Dhoni because he is very senior to me. I have played only one tournament with him and that was a domestic Twenty20 [ Images ] tournament. Then I got a chance to speak to him and learnt quite a few things. I have observed that he reads the game very quickly so that is one of the good things I have learnt from him," said the left-hander.

Despite believing that IPL is a good platform to showcase his talent, Tiwary has no preference when it comes to playing cricket. "A good player is one who excels in all formats including Tests, ODIs and Twenty20 cricket. Tests are still popular and the fans are still crazy for Test cricket. I love playing all formats because a good player is one who does well in all formats."

Source : Cricket.Rediff

Tiwary : IPL to domestic cricket You can't compare

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

Mumbai Indians [ Images ] batsman Saurabh Tiwary [ Images ] said a successful run in the Indian Premier League [ Images ] is the best way of getting noticed by the national selectors rather than grinding it out in domestic cricket.

"The IPL is a good platform for us youngsters because if you score runs here then everybody knows that you are a good cricketer because you get a lot of media coverage in this tournament. You cannot compare IPL to domestic cricket because even if you score 20 runs in this tournament, it gets coverage. But in domestic cricket it all depends on the media coverage - if that is good then your performance gets noticed," Tiwary said in Mumbai on Tuesday.

The 20-year-old Jharkhand batsman has been an integral part of Mumbai's smashing start to IPL 3. The left-hander started the tournament with back to back half-centuries for a tally of 169 runs in four matches at a healthy average of 43.

Tiwary's attacking approach has impressed even captain Sachin Tendulkar [ Images ], who has preferred to send him ahead of West Indian stars Dwayne Bravo [ Images ] and Kieron Pollard in the middle-order.

"It feels good when a captain shows confidence in your abilities and sends you ahead of the senior players," said a delighted Tiwary.

Hailing from India captain Mahindra Singh Dhoni's [ Images ] state, Tiwary also looks very much like the Indian captain at the start of his international career with his long flowing locks and stocky body. He rues at not having played enough cricket with Dhoni in domestic cricket.

"I have not played much cricket with Dhoni because he is very senior to me. I have played only one tournament with him and that was a domestic Twenty20 [ Images ] tournament. Then I got a chance to speak to him and learnt quite a few things. I have observed that he reads the game very quickly so that is one of the good things I have learnt from him," said the left-hander.

Despite believing that IPL is a good platform to showcase his talent, Tiwary has no preference when it comes to playing cricket. "A good player is one who excels in all formats including Tests, ODIs and Twenty20 cricket. Tests are still popular and the fans are still crazy for Test cricket. I love playing all formats because a good player is one who does well in all formats."

Source : Cricket.Rediff

Monday, March 22, 2010

Gangulay Take a Nice catch in DLF IPL.


Gangulay Take a Nice catch in DLF IPL.

Nice catch by ganguly in DLF IPL. This was one of his nice catches.

Gangulay Take a Nice catch in DLF IPL.


Gangulay Take a Nice catch in DLF IPL.

Nice catch by ganguly in DLF IPL. This was one of his nice catches.

To name T-20 WC captain tomorrow pakistan : cricket

http://www.topnews.in/sports/files/PCB_01_7.jpg

Mar 22 (PTI) Karachi, Ending of speculation, the Pakistan Cricket Board is all set to name the captain of the national team for the upcoming Twenty20 World Cup in Lahore tomorrow.

PCB is expected to announce the skipper of the national team during some domestic matches involving the senior side, A and under-19 teams scheduled to be held in Lahore.

While the PCB has named the captains of the national A side (Muhammad Hafeez) and under-19 team (Azeem Ghuman), it had not yet announced the skipper for the senior team, which will take on winners the match between Pakistan A and under-19 team under lights at the Gaddafi stadium tomorrow to celebrate Pakistan Day.

"The board plans to announce the captain the same day.

The player who will lead the national team in the festival match will also lead the team in the T20 World Cup," a PCB official said.

Source : Ptinews

To name T-20 WC captain tomorrow pakistan : cricket

http://www.topnews.in/sports/files/PCB_01_7.jpg

Mar 22 (PTI) Karachi, Ending of speculation, the Pakistan Cricket Board is all set to name the captain of the national team for the upcoming Twenty20 World Cup in Lahore tomorrow.

PCB is expected to announce the skipper of the national team during some domestic matches involving the senior side, A and under-19 teams scheduled to be held in Lahore.

While the PCB has named the captains of the national A side (Muhammad Hafeez) and under-19 team (Azeem Ghuman), it had not yet announced the skipper for the senior team, which will take on winners the match between Pakistan A and under-19 team under lights at the Gaddafi stadium tomorrow to celebrate Pakistan Day.

"The board plans to announce the captain the same day.

The player who will lead the national team in the festival match will also lead the team in the T20 World Cup," a PCB official said.

Source : Ptinews

Now Kolkata's new King is SRK

http://mrinkenti.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/srk_ipl.jpg

Parents name their children with sky-high expectations. You will find an absolute buffoon named Birbal, and a pip-squeak called Shamsher Bahadur. Very few are able to live up to their names. But then, Shah Rukh Khan is living a life beyond even his own imagination. The two Persian words, Shah Rukh, meaning ‘face of a king’, symbolises royalty in Bollywood. Now, it’s time to extend Kingdom Khan’s territory to the cricket field.

To all those who mocked at and slammed SRK’s Kolkata Knight Riders —in the eight-team Indian Premier League, Kolkata finished sixth in 2008 and eighth last year — Shah Rukh could have shown the middle finger. After all, financially, the Knight Riders were easily the most successful franchise in the IPL, making a profit of Rs 13 crore in the first edition itself.

But the man has reached a stage where pride becomes more important than money. To remain the king, the king has to win. Kolkata may make Rs 30 crore in 2010, but if the team doesn’t win, Shah Rukh loses. In his own words, SRK says he doesn’t need money any more because he can make it with ridiculous ease. Talking about the passion that is driving him to run a high-profile cricket team, he said recently in Kolkata, “I didn’t buy a cricket team to make money. I dance at weddings and make much more money there. I endorse so many products, from a phone company to cola, I don’t have to worry about money.

Some things run on passion; I am a sportsperson myself, so I bought a cricket team. I want to pass it on to my children. Movies, I don’t do them for money. If I like a subject, I will put money on it and make a film.” I was in Kolkata for Knight Riders’ matches against Bangalore and Chennai, and as luck would have it, I saw Shah Rukh from close quarters taking rough with the smooth. Kolkata thrashed Bangalore, and got thrashed by Chennai. But something has changed over the last two years. I did not see Shah Rukh breaking into a wild celebration when the going was good (in IPL I, he broke a dozen-odd chairs jumping on them at a fall of mere one opposition wicket), nor did he go all gloom-and-doom in defeat.

Shah Rukh in victory blew a few kisses to the crowds, showed a thumbs-up to Sourav Ganguly, and later, shook hands with the entire team and the opposition. Shah Rukh in defeat blew a few kisses to the crowds, showed a thumbs-up to Sourav Ganguly, and later, shook hands with the entire team and the opposition.

A few minutes into the match, cop’s walkie-talkies began cracking. Frenzied voices were trying to communicate something in Bengali, “Shah Rukh Khan, Shah Rukh Khan” the only words I was able to decipher. Cops mounted on 7-feet tall horses began clearing the road, they looked so threatening, it was clear they would not spare anyone the whip.

And then, a fleet of cars... one, two, three, wait, that’s the police escort, OK, one, two, three... one of them only for King Khan, the second one has his entourage, his friends from Bollywood, and the third one, more entourage, more friends from Bollywood.

It’s around 8.30 pm and Shah Rukh has just arrived from Mumbai. He’s dressed in a black shirt, and is looking supremely fit.

Eden Gardens, filled to the brim with almost 70,000 people (it can hold 1.10 lakh, but two stands are being renovated), comes to a standstill as Shah Rukh takes his seat in the open galleria. Front row, first seat, but before that, he has an obligation to fulfil.

A single ticket to that galleria costs Rs 32,000, but it’s packed. They all want to meet Shah Rukh. The superstar shakes hands with all the ticket-holders, even as his bodyguards ensure nobody gets too close for comfort.

Just then, an attractive blonde appears... Shah Rukh has to slip into Kolkata Knight Riders jersey. She helps him put it on, it’s his shoulder again. Despite a surgery, it’s throbbing with pain. She hands him his drink as he blows kisses to the crowds, the women are going wild, the jealous men are smirking.

The prince of Kolkata is in the field, marshalling his men, but Kolkata has chosen its king. He is in the court now, clapping when his army does well, nodding when the opposition gives it back, and now, dignified in victory and defeat.

Source : Movies.Indiatimes

Now Kolkata's new King is SRK

http://mrinkenti.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/srk_ipl.jpg

Parents name their children with sky-high expectations. You will find an absolute buffoon named Birbal, and a pip-squeak called Shamsher Bahadur. Very few are able to live up to their names. But then, Shah Rukh Khan is living a life beyond even his own imagination. The two Persian words, Shah Rukh, meaning ‘face of a king’, symbolises royalty in Bollywood. Now, it’s time to extend Kingdom Khan’s territory to the cricket field.

To all those who mocked at and slammed SRK’s Kolkata Knight Riders —in the eight-team Indian Premier League, Kolkata finished sixth in 2008 and eighth last year — Shah Rukh could have shown the middle finger. After all, financially, the Knight Riders were easily the most successful franchise in the IPL, making a profit of Rs 13 crore in the first edition itself.

But the man has reached a stage where pride becomes more important than money. To remain the king, the king has to win. Kolkata may make Rs 30 crore in 2010, but if the team doesn’t win, Shah Rukh loses. In his own words, SRK says he doesn’t need money any more because he can make it with ridiculous ease. Talking about the passion that is driving him to run a high-profile cricket team, he said recently in Kolkata, “I didn’t buy a cricket team to make money. I dance at weddings and make much more money there. I endorse so many products, from a phone company to cola, I don’t have to worry about money.

Some things run on passion; I am a sportsperson myself, so I bought a cricket team. I want to pass it on to my children. Movies, I don’t do them for money. If I like a subject, I will put money on it and make a film.” I was in Kolkata for Knight Riders’ matches against Bangalore and Chennai, and as luck would have it, I saw Shah Rukh from close quarters taking rough with the smooth. Kolkata thrashed Bangalore, and got thrashed by Chennai. But something has changed over the last two years. I did not see Shah Rukh breaking into a wild celebration when the going was good (in IPL I, he broke a dozen-odd chairs jumping on them at a fall of mere one opposition wicket), nor did he go all gloom-and-doom in defeat.

Shah Rukh in victory blew a few kisses to the crowds, showed a thumbs-up to Sourav Ganguly, and later, shook hands with the entire team and the opposition. Shah Rukh in defeat blew a few kisses to the crowds, showed a thumbs-up to Sourav Ganguly, and later, shook hands with the entire team and the opposition.

A few minutes into the match, cop’s walkie-talkies began cracking. Frenzied voices were trying to communicate something in Bengali, “Shah Rukh Khan, Shah Rukh Khan” the only words I was able to decipher. Cops mounted on 7-feet tall horses began clearing the road, they looked so threatening, it was clear they would not spare anyone the whip.

And then, a fleet of cars... one, two, three, wait, that’s the police escort, OK, one, two, three... one of them only for King Khan, the second one has his entourage, his friends from Bollywood, and the third one, more entourage, more friends from Bollywood.

It’s around 8.30 pm and Shah Rukh has just arrived from Mumbai. He’s dressed in a black shirt, and is looking supremely fit.

Eden Gardens, filled to the brim with almost 70,000 people (it can hold 1.10 lakh, but two stands are being renovated), comes to a standstill as Shah Rukh takes his seat in the open galleria. Front row, first seat, but before that, he has an obligation to fulfil.

A single ticket to that galleria costs Rs 32,000, but it’s packed. They all want to meet Shah Rukh. The superstar shakes hands with all the ticket-holders, even as his bodyguards ensure nobody gets too close for comfort.

Just then, an attractive blonde appears... Shah Rukh has to slip into Kolkata Knight Riders jersey. She helps him put it on, it’s his shoulder again. Despite a surgery, it’s throbbing with pain. She hands him his drink as he blows kisses to the crowds, the women are going wild, the jealous men are smirking.

The prince of Kolkata is in the field, marshalling his men, but Kolkata has chosen its king. He is in the court now, clapping when his army does well, nodding when the opposition gives it back, and now, dignified in victory and defeat.

Source : Movies.Indiatimes

Sunday, March 21, 2010

IPL teams reach new record

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

The Indian Premier League set a new record on Sunday, as it sold two new teams for $703m in a clear sign of the growing interest among companies to reach India’s burgeoning consumer classes via the country’s most lucrative sporting extravaganza.

Indian conglomerate Sahara and Rendezvous Sport bought the Pune and Kochi teams for $370m and $333m, respectively, more than the total it fetched for the franchise of eight teams it auctioned when the cricket tournament was launched two years ago.

Lalit Modi, chairman of the Indian Premier League, proudly told members of the Board of Control for Cricket in India, the sport’s organising body in the country, that: “I don’t think there is any recession going on as far as the IPL is concerned.”

He added: “The last eight teams that were auctioned by the [cricket board] realised a total value of Rs28.4bn [$624.7m]. The two new teams alone are more than the value of all the eight teams put together.”

The existing eight teams, which were bought by Bollywood stars and industrialists in early 2008, fetched between $60m and $112m each for the Indian cricket board. However, since the launch of the Twenty20 tournament, the IPL has managed to build a strong global audience. It has cut bigger deals with advertisers, sponsors and broadcasters, and valuations for franchises have gone through the roof.

The two new teams will join the tournament in 2011 in the fourth edition of the cash-rich cricket league, boosting the number of games to 94, from the existing 60, if the current format of the game is retained.

“[The auction] isn’t only about two new teams,” said one commentator on India cricket. “It’s about the economics of the game, because from 60 games we are going to go up to 94, there will be at least 100 new players, there will be new sponsors, new logos ... the interest is going to become more global.”

In the current season, the IPL has developed into a more than $4bn industry through the sale of television broadcast rights, team franchises, and other sponsorships, according to London-based Brand Finance.

“The IPL brand alone has risen significantly from the previous year’s valuation providing tremendous economic value to its owner BCCI,” said Unni Krishnan, managing director of Brand Finance India. “The IPL juggernaut, in a short span of 3 years, is valued at $4bn and has the potential to grow further.”

Sony paid $1bn to own the television broadcast rights for the next 10 years and others, such as Vodafone of the UK, have captured some of the main TV sponsorship slots. This year Google also joined hands with the glitzy tournament, as it signed a deal – for an undisclosed sum – to broadcast IPL matches via its YouTube video website.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2010. You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.

IPL teams reach new record

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

The Indian Premier League set a new record on Sunday, as it sold two new teams for $703m in a clear sign of the growing interest among companies to reach India’s burgeoning consumer classes via the country’s most lucrative sporting extravaganza.

Indian conglomerate Sahara and Rendezvous Sport bought the Pune and Kochi teams for $370m and $333m, respectively, more than the total it fetched for the franchise of eight teams it auctioned when the cricket tournament was launched two years ago.

Lalit Modi, chairman of the Indian Premier League, proudly told members of the Board of Control for Cricket in India, the sport’s organising body in the country, that: “I don’t think there is any recession going on as far as the IPL is concerned.”

He added: “The last eight teams that were auctioned by the [cricket board] realised a total value of Rs28.4bn [$624.7m]. The two new teams alone are more than the value of all the eight teams put together.”

The existing eight teams, which were bought by Bollywood stars and industrialists in early 2008, fetched between $60m and $112m each for the Indian cricket board. However, since the launch of the Twenty20 tournament, the IPL has managed to build a strong global audience. It has cut bigger deals with advertisers, sponsors and broadcasters, and valuations for franchises have gone through the roof.

The two new teams will join the tournament in 2011 in the fourth edition of the cash-rich cricket league, boosting the number of games to 94, from the existing 60, if the current format of the game is retained.

“[The auction] isn’t only about two new teams,” said one commentator on India cricket. “It’s about the economics of the game, because from 60 games we are going to go up to 94, there will be at least 100 new players, there will be new sponsors, new logos ... the interest is going to become more global.”

In the current season, the IPL has developed into a more than $4bn industry through the sale of television broadcast rights, team franchises, and other sponsorships, according to London-based Brand Finance.

“The IPL brand alone has risen significantly from the previous year’s valuation providing tremendous economic value to its owner BCCI,” said Unni Krishnan, managing director of Brand Finance India. “The IPL juggernaut, in a short span of 3 years, is valued at $4bn and has the potential to grow further.”

Sony paid $1bn to own the television broadcast rights for the next 10 years and others, such as Vodafone of the UK, have captured some of the main TV sponsorship slots. This year Google also joined hands with the glitzy tournament, as it signed a deal – for an undisclosed sum – to broadcast IPL matches via its YouTube video website.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2010. You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.

Saturday, March 20, 2010

Is IPL cricket a helper for indian cricket?

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

Much has been written and spoken about the new avatar of Indian cricket: the Indian Premier League or IPL as we love to call it. The league was envisaged on the backdrop of India’s famous victory at the first ever T20 World Cup in 2007. Sensing the T20 format to be the next golden goose, Indian cricket administrators, led by Lalit Modi, immediately introduced a T20 league that had city rivalry at its core.

Apart from some die-hard cricket romantics, who loved to watch the drab of five-day pajama cricket, most of the cricketing fraternity in the country was happy. The league opened the flood-gates of cash for cricketers. The established ones got richer by leaps and bounds. Even the mediocre cricketers got rich. Everybody attached to the league, be it umpires, commentators, event management groups, former players or even the skimpily dressed girls dancing after every boundary, has got something to cheer for!

But the best thing the league brought, which most of us overlook, is for the little known domestic cricketers. They got the kind of money, which they never imagined and got the fame they never dreamt of.

For the majority of the parents in India, who always tried to get their children away from this ‘game of time wasting’, cricket, has suddenly became a superb career option.

Since everyone is happy, what is plaguing some ‘chicken-hearted’ cricket writers and some old time cricket romantics?

The million dollar question is: Is the IPL taking Indian cricket forward? As for that matter, is it helping our Team India in any way?

The first objection with a hectic league like IPL is that it is causing some serious burn-outs and injuries to our stars, whose role is very important in India’s cricketing fortunes at the world stage.

Since IPL is yet to get a place in the ICC’s Future Tour Programme (FTP), the league is generally sandwiched between two important tours or major ICC events like World Cups. Last year, Twenty20 World Cup started just a week after the second edition of IPL.

When the Indians players started to defend their World Cup title, they were looking out of form with drooping shoulders. They were nowhere near the physical and mental conditioning that is needed to compete at the top stage. The most disturbing factor that divided the Indian team’s campaign was the injury of Virender Sehwag that he sustained during IPL-II.

This year too, Twenty20 World Cup is starting four days after the final match of IPL which will surely hamper India’s chances at the event. Moreover, India’s two top cricketers-captain MS Dhoni and Gautam Gambhir have already gotten injured while playing in the initial phase of IPL. With more than a month left for the league to get over, more injuries can be expected.

Apart from burn-outs and injuries, IPL is producing a pseudo confidence among Indian cricketers. If we compare the standard of the league with any other ICC event, it is still mediocre. Last year, the Indian players who thrived during the IPL, miserably failed at the World Cup. The Rainas, Rohits, Pathans realised that the performances in IPL are not easy to translate into success at the world stage and they were not world class by any means till they bent their back into more training.

Source : Cricket.Zeenews

Is IPL cricket a helper for indian cricket?

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

Much has been written and spoken about the new avatar of Indian cricket: the Indian Premier League or IPL as we love to call it. The league was envisaged on the backdrop of India’s famous victory at the first ever T20 World Cup in 2007. Sensing the T20 format to be the next golden goose, Indian cricket administrators, led by Lalit Modi, immediately introduced a T20 league that had city rivalry at its core.

Apart from some die-hard cricket romantics, who loved to watch the drab of five-day pajama cricket, most of the cricketing fraternity in the country was happy. The league opened the flood-gates of cash for cricketers. The established ones got richer by leaps and bounds. Even the mediocre cricketers got rich. Everybody attached to the league, be it umpires, commentators, event management groups, former players or even the skimpily dressed girls dancing after every boundary, has got something to cheer for!

But the best thing the league brought, which most of us overlook, is for the little known domestic cricketers. They got the kind of money, which they never imagined and got the fame they never dreamt of.

For the majority of the parents in India, who always tried to get their children away from this ‘game of time wasting’, cricket, has suddenly became a superb career option.

Since everyone is happy, what is plaguing some ‘chicken-hearted’ cricket writers and some old time cricket romantics?

The million dollar question is: Is the IPL taking Indian cricket forward? As for that matter, is it helping our Team India in any way?

The first objection with a hectic league like IPL is that it is causing some serious burn-outs and injuries to our stars, whose role is very important in India’s cricketing fortunes at the world stage.

Since IPL is yet to get a place in the ICC’s Future Tour Programme (FTP), the league is generally sandwiched between two important tours or major ICC events like World Cups. Last year, Twenty20 World Cup started just a week after the second edition of IPL.

When the Indians players started to defend their World Cup title, they were looking out of form with drooping shoulders. They were nowhere near the physical and mental conditioning that is needed to compete at the top stage. The most disturbing factor that divided the Indian team’s campaign was the injury of Virender Sehwag that he sustained during IPL-II.

This year too, Twenty20 World Cup is starting four days after the final match of IPL which will surely hamper India’s chances at the event. Moreover, India’s two top cricketers-captain MS Dhoni and Gautam Gambhir have already gotten injured while playing in the initial phase of IPL. With more than a month left for the league to get over, more injuries can be expected.

Apart from burn-outs and injuries, IPL is producing a pseudo confidence among Indian cricketers. If we compare the standard of the league with any other ICC event, it is still mediocre. Last year, the Indian players who thrived during the IPL, miserably failed at the World Cup. The Rainas, Rohits, Pathans realised that the performances in IPL are not easy to translate into success at the world stage and they were not world class by any means till they bent their back into more training.

Source : Cricket.Zeenews

Friday, March 19, 2010

Kevin Pietersen with improved form : Cricket hospitality

http://images.smh.com.au/ftsmh/ffximage/2009/04/19/kevin_pietersen_wideweb__470x368,0.jpg

kevin Pietersen missed much of last summer's Ashes triumph because of an Achilles injury and struggled for form in the drawn Test series in South Africa.

He also looked out of sorts in the one-day series in Bangladesh, but hit a quick-fire 99 in the comfortable first Test victory last week.

The 29-year-old said it felt good to finally record a big score after recovering from what he regarded as a career-threatening injury.

"It's taken a little bit longer than I'd have liked, but I feel great now which is fantastic," he said.

Kevin Pietersen will have a chance to build on his first Test display when the final Test gets underway in Mirpur this weekend. He will then return home to face the same opposition in another Test series.

Corporate hospitality guests will be able to watch the England v Bangladesh games at Lord's in May and Old Trafford in June.

Source :Keithprowse

Kevin Pietersen with improved form : Cricket hospitality

http://images.smh.com.au/ftsmh/ffximage/2009/04/19/kevin_pietersen_wideweb__470x368,0.jpg

kevin Pietersen missed much of last summer's Ashes triumph because of an Achilles injury and struggled for form in the drawn Test series in South Africa.

He also looked out of sorts in the one-day series in Bangladesh, but hit a quick-fire 99 in the comfortable first Test victory last week.

The 29-year-old said it felt good to finally record a big score after recovering from what he regarded as a career-threatening injury.

"It's taken a little bit longer than I'd have liked, but I feel great now which is fantastic," he said.

Kevin Pietersen will have a chance to build on his first Test display when the final Test gets underway in Mirpur this weekend. He will then return home to face the same opposition in another Test series.

Corporate hospitality guests will be able to watch the England v Bangladesh games at Lord's in May and Old Trafford in June.

Source :Keithprowse

Book written by John Simpson: Hitler had once played cricket

http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Politics/images-2/adolf-hitler.jpg

Adolf Hitler, the German dictator, had once played cricket and had wanted to “Nazify” the game by rewriting its rules, according to a new book.

The book says that after the game, the Fuhrer had “advocated the withdrawal of the use of pads” because the “artificial bolsters” were “unmanly and un-German“.

Hitler “advocated the withdrawal of the use of pads. These artificial ‘bolsters’ he dismissed as unmanly and un-German.

He also recommended a bigger and harder ball,” John Simpson wrote in the book on 20{+t}{+h}-century reporting, citing a piece of article in the Daily Mirror in 1930.

The Fuhrer, had an ulterior motive for wanting to learn the game. “He desired to study it as a possible medium for the training of troops off duty and in times of peace. He also wanted the game to be Nazified,” The Times said quoting the 1930 article.

The Mirror piece that appeared under the headline “Adolf Hitler As I Know Him” on September 30, 1930, was written by Oliver Locker-Lampson, an MP and fervent admirer of Hitler.

It revealed that the dictator was taught the rules of the game by British troops to play a friendly match against some POWs of the First World War.

In the article, Locker-Lampson describes the series of event to the only game played by Hitler.

He informs how in 1923, shortly after the Munich putsch, Hitler had asked some British POWs to teach the game and how, they (prisoners of war) have written the rules for him in the best British sport-loving spirit“.

The Locker-Lampson’s article, however, fails to inform who won the match.

Source :

Book written by John Simpson: Hitler had once played cricket

http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Politics/images-2/adolf-hitler.jpg

Adolf Hitler, the German dictator, had once played cricket and had wanted to “Nazify” the game by rewriting its rules, according to a new book.

The book says that after the game, the Fuhrer had “advocated the withdrawal of the use of pads” because the “artificial bolsters” were “unmanly and un-German“.

Hitler “advocated the withdrawal of the use of pads. These artificial ‘bolsters’ he dismissed as unmanly and un-German.

He also recommended a bigger and harder ball,” John Simpson wrote in the book on 20{+t}{+h}-century reporting, citing a piece of article in the Daily Mirror in 1930.

The Fuhrer, had an ulterior motive for wanting to learn the game. “He desired to study it as a possible medium for the training of troops off duty and in times of peace. He also wanted the game to be Nazified,” The Times said quoting the 1930 article.

The Mirror piece that appeared under the headline “Adolf Hitler As I Know Him” on September 30, 1930, was written by Oliver Locker-Lampson, an MP and fervent admirer of Hitler.

It revealed that the dictator was taught the rules of the game by British troops to play a friendly match against some POWs of the First World War.

In the article, Locker-Lampson describes the series of event to the only game played by Hitler.

He informs how in 1923, shortly after the Munich putsch, Hitler had asked some British POWs to teach the game and how, they (prisoners of war) have written the rules for him in the best British sport-loving spirit“.

The Locker-Lampson’s article, however, fails to inform who won the match.

Source :

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Despite tight security for Cricket team

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01203/cricket-security_1203941i.jpg

Cricket tournament amid fears of attacks by militants. The BBC's Soutik Biswas attends a match in Delhi to take a look.

What do you need to do to watch the world's greatest cricketer (Sachin Tendulkar) pitted in rare battle against one of its most destructive batsmen (Virender Sehwag)?

Well - if you are in the Indian capital, Delhi, at least - you may like to follow the police advisory and arrive at least four hours before the game armed with your ticket.

Once you're at an untidy park-and-ride to the ground, make sure you are not carrying any of the "33 items" prohibited by the city police.

The intriguing list includes:

* chairs and stools (why should anybody be carrying them to a modern stadium?)
* skateboards (where can you skate in the stands?)
* animals (I have never seen a spectator with a pet at any cricket match)
* distress signals (intriguing)
* "loud hailer/whistle/horn", balloons, bottles and cameras.

All this is in aid of securing the spectators, of course.

The authorities are keen to allay concerns, particularly ahead of the Commonwealth Games later this year.

Stamina and patience

Police in Delhi appear to be leaving nothing to chance when it comes to protecting the packed-to-the brim IPL matches, considering the tense security environment in the country.

But it's not easy to attend a game - you need lots of stamina and patience.

I went through half a dozen security checks en route to Wednesday night's game between the Delhi Daredevils and the Mumbai Indians - two rounds of frisking, and a jangling journey through a noisy metal detector.

Every "checkpoint" at the Feroz Shah Kotla ground was littered with "prohibited" detritus confiscated from hapless fans - a pile of cigarette packets, enough pens to set up a stationary shop, a mountain of cigarette lighters.

I had to part with my chewing gum - when I asked why, an officer said that my gum box was a potential "projectile". Some reporters have described such tight security as an example of "police high-handedness".

But most spectators I chatted with appeared to have happily accepted it.

"We keep reading in the papers that Delhi is a prime target for terrorists. It's better to be safe than sorry and go through these checks," says a young fan, Ravi Bhatia.

Inside the ground, security was firm but fairly unobtrusive, allowing fans to breathe and enjoy the game.

Delhi police spokesperson Rajan Bhagat told me that there were layers of security inside the ground - policemen, armed and otherwise, along with private security guards keep an eye on the stands and around the periphery of the ground.

It is not in your face, and it looks pretty well managed.

Source : News.BBC

Despite tight security for Cricket team

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01203/cricket-security_1203941i.jpg

Cricket tournament amid fears of attacks by militants. The BBC's Soutik Biswas attends a match in Delhi to take a look.

What do you need to do to watch the world's greatest cricketer (Sachin Tendulkar) pitted in rare battle against one of its most destructive batsmen (Virender Sehwag)?

Well - if you are in the Indian capital, Delhi, at least - you may like to follow the police advisory and arrive at least four hours before the game armed with your ticket.

Once you're at an untidy park-and-ride to the ground, make sure you are not carrying any of the "33 items" prohibited by the city police.

The intriguing list includes:

* chairs and stools (why should anybody be carrying them to a modern stadium?)
* skateboards (where can you skate in the stands?)
* animals (I have never seen a spectator with a pet at any cricket match)
* distress signals (intriguing)
* "loud hailer/whistle/horn", balloons, bottles and cameras.

All this is in aid of securing the spectators, of course.

The authorities are keen to allay concerns, particularly ahead of the Commonwealth Games later this year.

Stamina and patience

Police in Delhi appear to be leaving nothing to chance when it comes to protecting the packed-to-the brim IPL matches, considering the tense security environment in the country.

But it's not easy to attend a game - you need lots of stamina and patience.

I went through half a dozen security checks en route to Wednesday night's game between the Delhi Daredevils and the Mumbai Indians - two rounds of frisking, and a jangling journey through a noisy metal detector.

Every "checkpoint" at the Feroz Shah Kotla ground was littered with "prohibited" detritus confiscated from hapless fans - a pile of cigarette packets, enough pens to set up a stationary shop, a mountain of cigarette lighters.

I had to part with my chewing gum - when I asked why, an officer said that my gum box was a potential "projectile". Some reporters have described such tight security as an example of "police high-handedness".

But most spectators I chatted with appeared to have happily accepted it.

"We keep reading in the papers that Delhi is a prime target for terrorists. It's better to be safe than sorry and go through these checks," says a young fan, Ravi Bhatia.

Inside the ground, security was firm but fairly unobtrusive, allowing fans to breathe and enjoy the game.

Delhi police spokesperson Rajan Bhagat told me that there were layers of security inside the ground - policemen, armed and otherwise, along with private security guards keep an eye on the stands and around the periphery of the ground.

It is not in your face, and it looks pretty well managed.

Source : News.BBC

'No negative influence on Clarke to Bingle'

ho spotted Michael Clarke as a seven-year-old and helped mould him into a cricket star, has rebutted suggestions that Lara Bingle was a negative influence on the Australian vice-captain.

Clarke will not be mentally broken by his high-profile bust-up with Lara, he said.

D'Costa has exchanged a series of text messages with Clarke in the past week, and said the soap opera would not derail his international career or planned ascension to the Test captaincy.

"Michael can now get on with his life. The question is how he will deal with it?" he said.

D'Costa said in the three years Bingle and Clarke dated the Australian vice captain scored 2604 Test runs at 56.60.

His first knock with Bingle as his partner was 145 not out against Sri Lanka. His career average before he met Bingle was 42.

"If he wasn't happy, it would have shown. When Michael was with Lara, he did well on and off the field. He won the Allan Border Medal, he has been our most consistent batsman. In that time, he represented his country with honour.

"She must have been a good influence on his life. He was a young man in love," The Daily Telegraph quoted D'Costa, as saying.

He said either Bingle was good for the cricketer or, like his close friend Shane Warne, Clarke had a rare ability to compartmentalise his public and private lives.

Clarke yesterday paid tribute to Warne, saying he had relied on his former teammate to help him through a dramatic week.

Source : Timesofindia.Indiatimes

'No negative influence on Clarke to Bingle'

ho spotted Michael Clarke as a seven-year-old and helped mould him into a cricket star, has rebutted suggestions that Lara Bingle was a negative influence on the Australian vice-captain.

Clarke will not be mentally broken by his high-profile bust-up with Lara, he said.

D'Costa has exchanged a series of text messages with Clarke in the past week, and said the soap opera would not derail his international career or planned ascension to the Test captaincy.

"Michael can now get on with his life. The question is how he will deal with it?" he said.

D'Costa said in the three years Bingle and Clarke dated the Australian vice captain scored 2604 Test runs at 56.60.

His first knock with Bingle as his partner was 145 not out against Sri Lanka. His career average before he met Bingle was 42.

"If he wasn't happy, it would have shown. When Michael was with Lara, he did well on and off the field. He won the Allan Border Medal, he has been our most consistent batsman. In that time, he represented his country with honour.

"She must have been a good influence on his life. He was a young man in love," The Daily Telegraph quoted D'Costa, as saying.

He said either Bingle was good for the cricketer or, like his close friend Shane Warne, Clarke had a rare ability to compartmentalise his public and private lives.

Clarke yesterday paid tribute to Warne, saying he had relied on his former teammate to help him through a dramatic week.

Source : Timesofindia.Indiatimes

For Bangladeshi league yousuf pathan receives PCB's green signal

http://photogallery.indiatimes.com/celebs/sports/yusuf-pathan/Yusuf-Pathan/photo/2514194/Yusuf-Pathan.jpg

A day after the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) clarified that players must seek permission from it to participate in any foreign cricket tournament, former captain Mohammed Yousuf has been allowed to play in a private league in Bangladesh.

"Yousuf had requested the PCB that he wanted to play in Bangladesh and Ijaz (Butt) has given him the permission," The Daily Times quoted a PCB spokesperson, as saying.

It may be noted that the PCB had issued a strict warning to the players wanting to participate in domestic tournaments of other countries, saying they must obtain a no-objection certificate (NOC) from the board.

"The PCB firmly conveys to all concerned that no player is allowed to play cricket outside Pakistan without having prior approval from the board in this regard. Any player interested to play cricket in any part of the world should apply to the board to seek permission for the same," a statement issued by the PCB said.

The PCB has prohibited players selected for the upcoming ICC T20 World Championship from taking part in Bangladesh's domestic T20 tournament, which is to be played in Sharjah.

Shahid Afridi, Umar Akmal, Mohammed Hafeez, Abdul Razzaq and Imtan Nazir had signed for the tournament beginning March 26 but insiders said the PCB do not want to risk these players ahead of the coveted T20 World Cup and is unlikely to grant them the NOC's. (ANI)

Source : Sify

For Bangladeshi league yousuf pathan receives PCB's green signal

http://photogallery.indiatimes.com/celebs/sports/yusuf-pathan/Yusuf-Pathan/photo/2514194/Yusuf-Pathan.jpg

A day after the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) clarified that players must seek permission from it to participate in any foreign cricket tournament, former captain Mohammed Yousuf has been allowed to play in a private league in Bangladesh.

"Yousuf had requested the PCB that he wanted to play in Bangladesh and Ijaz (Butt) has given him the permission," The Daily Times quoted a PCB spokesperson, as saying.

It may be noted that the PCB had issued a strict warning to the players wanting to participate in domestic tournaments of other countries, saying they must obtain a no-objection certificate (NOC) from the board.

"The PCB firmly conveys to all concerned that no player is allowed to play cricket outside Pakistan without having prior approval from the board in this regard. Any player interested to play cricket in any part of the world should apply to the board to seek permission for the same," a statement issued by the PCB said.

The PCB has prohibited players selected for the upcoming ICC T20 World Championship from taking part in Bangladesh's domestic T20 tournament, which is to be played in Sharjah.

Shahid Afridi, Umar Akmal, Mohammed Hafeez, Abdul Razzaq and Imtan Nazir had signed for the tournament beginning March 26 but insiders said the PCB do not want to risk these players ahead of the coveted T20 World Cup and is unlikely to grant them the NOC's. (ANI)

Source : Sify

From its shackles Modi has freed cricket

http://www.topnews.in/sports/files/Lalit-Modi3.jpg

Sachin too provided us rare moments of joy at the Kotla and I suspect, there is a lot more that he can offer provided he is allowed to pick and choose his games. After all, having played for two decades, the body might not be as willing as it used to be. I wonder when he will eventually get a T20 hundred (this season?) that would nicely round off his career!

In the past few weeks, I have had a few opportunities to move closely with the Chennai Super Kings team. Although I didn't interact with Dhoni, I watched him from close quarters at a pre-tournament dinner and I was struck by his composure. The smile hardly left his face and the manner in which he responded to the felicitations with a brief speech, it was clear that he has got comfortable with his celebrity status and is not taken in by all the adulation.

Quite obviously, Dhoni and Sachin are the biggest brands and icons in cricket today that is in the midst of evolving from a sport to a reality show (read IPL). It did take me a while to accept the T20 format and IPL, given the various elements that hitherto were alien to cricket.

The dancing girls, the music, the time-outs, the short boundaries, the marketing blitz, etc., at first hurt my cricketing senses. But then, Lalit Modi and his merry bunch seem to have freed sport from its chains and shackles much like Packer had done in the 1970s with his 'pyjama cricket' called World Series Cricket.

The traditionalists had revolted against the WSC and branded Packer as a villain. Three decades hence, the late Aussie tycoon is perceived as a 'visionary' who was probably ahead of his time. Likewise, we might today scoff at the Lalit Modis of the world for turning cricket into a business venture, but the IPL is only a reflection of the times we live in where only money talks and sentiment walks.

Much as I treasure the 'whites' of Test cricket, I wouldn't like to turn a blind eye to ground reality. The pace of life has quickened, the values have changed, people demand instant gratification and returns, and of course, there is more money floating around than ever before. A friend of mine even told me that if you have a skill, then learn to market and 'monetise' it. I wonder why nobody said this to me a quarter of a century ago when I started off as a journalist and I would have been a millionaire by now!

I am not holding a candle for IPL because the quality of cricket is rarely top drawer stuff. The hit-or-miss can be pretty jarring. I would rather watch Sachin playing a cover-drive than scooping the ball over the wicket-keeper, but then, he like his ilk, has 'adjusted' to the changes, but significantly, has chosen not to play T20 for India.

It is a boom period for cricket, at least in India. The bubble is getting bigger by the day. By way of logical progression, I expect IPL to go global and probably 'India' will be replaced by 'International', provided of course, the authorities eschew avarice or else, the bubble will burst.

Ultimately, the power is within us to accept or reject. As for me, life goes on, with or without IPL that, after all, is a mere blip in human evolution.

Source : Sify

From its shackles Modi has freed cricket

http://www.topnews.in/sports/files/Lalit-Modi3.jpg

Sachin too provided us rare moments of joy at the Kotla and I suspect, there is a lot more that he can offer provided he is allowed to pick and choose his games. After all, having played for two decades, the body might not be as willing as it used to be. I wonder when he will eventually get a T20 hundred (this season?) that would nicely round off his career!

In the past few weeks, I have had a few opportunities to move closely with the Chennai Super Kings team. Although I didn't interact with Dhoni, I watched him from close quarters at a pre-tournament dinner and I was struck by his composure. The smile hardly left his face and the manner in which he responded to the felicitations with a brief speech, it was clear that he has got comfortable with his celebrity status and is not taken in by all the adulation.

Quite obviously, Dhoni and Sachin are the biggest brands and icons in cricket today that is in the midst of evolving from a sport to a reality show (read IPL). It did take me a while to accept the T20 format and IPL, given the various elements that hitherto were alien to cricket.

The dancing girls, the music, the time-outs, the short boundaries, the marketing blitz, etc., at first hurt my cricketing senses. But then, Lalit Modi and his merry bunch seem to have freed sport from its chains and shackles much like Packer had done in the 1970s with his 'pyjama cricket' called World Series Cricket.

The traditionalists had revolted against the WSC and branded Packer as a villain. Three decades hence, the late Aussie tycoon is perceived as a 'visionary' who was probably ahead of his time. Likewise, we might today scoff at the Lalit Modis of the world for turning cricket into a business venture, but the IPL is only a reflection of the times we live in where only money talks and sentiment walks.

Much as I treasure the 'whites' of Test cricket, I wouldn't like to turn a blind eye to ground reality. The pace of life has quickened, the values have changed, people demand instant gratification and returns, and of course, there is more money floating around than ever before. A friend of mine even told me that if you have a skill, then learn to market and 'monetise' it. I wonder why nobody said this to me a quarter of a century ago when I started off as a journalist and I would have been a millionaire by now!

I am not holding a candle for IPL because the quality of cricket is rarely top drawer stuff. The hit-or-miss can be pretty jarring. I would rather watch Sachin playing a cover-drive than scooping the ball over the wicket-keeper, but then, he like his ilk, has 'adjusted' to the changes, but significantly, has chosen not to play T20 for India.

It is a boom period for cricket, at least in India. The bubble is getting bigger by the day. By way of logical progression, I expect IPL to go global and probably 'India' will be replaced by 'International', provided of course, the authorities eschew avarice or else, the bubble will burst.

Ultimately, the power is within us to accept or reject. As for me, life goes on, with or without IPL that, after all, is a mere blip in human evolution.

Source : Sify

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Delhi Daredevils vs Mumbai Indians

http://totalgadha.com/tgtown/sidd/files/2010/01/mumbai_indians_logo.jpg
New Delhi: Indian Premier League 2010 IPL live streaming cricket: Delhi Daredevils vs Mumbai Indians. A match between Delhi and Mumbai always draws huge fans from across the country. It is usual to see throng of cricket mavens lining outside the stadium to see their stars perform. Both the teams have captive audience. Their Ranji Trophy tie is a huge hit.

And now they are facing each others in the IPL-3 at the Ferozeshah Kotla, New Delhi. Sport historians say that both the metros will be electrified on the match day. Hundreds of thousands will converge on the stadium to watch master-blaster Sachin Tendulkar play amazing shots.

However, the players are so excited. For them it is another match. Ace batsman Sachin confirms this. “The confidence is high. We are working together,” said Sachin.

However, many people are of the opinion that this match would be the best one of the season. The Daredevils will be difficult to be tamed. They possess some of the best cricketers in the world. They are in a great form, whacking Kings XI Punjab and Rajasthan Royals. And now their target will be the Mumbai Indians.

Delhi Daredevils assistant coach Eric Simmons is confident of his team’s ability to maul the rival. "We have a few surprises for them (Mumbai Indians). We know that Mumbai Indians are a good side and they have depth both in their bowling and batting. We have a strategy for them and hopefully we'll succeed with it tomorrow," said Simmons.

Source : Khabrein

Live Streaming of IPL T20

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

IPL
has given new dimensions to Cricket .First IPL was a huge hit in monetary terms as well as an entertainment package also. When it was problematic to organize the IPL -2 in India due to security reasons. Then, it was made possible to organize the event in South Africa.

Though it was not that successful as compare to the first edition. And now the IPL fever is back in India and back with a bang. Though controversies are regular companion of IPL.

This time no news channel has the right to telecast the visuals of IPL .But here again here organizers has again find the solution and made a deal with you tube to telecast all the matches on their website. Though the, matches can been seen on the website but with a short delay of five minutes of actual status. So it would be a nice step to connect all the net savvy with IPL.

Source : Haryananews

Live Streaming of IPL T20

http://starbozz.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/ipl.jpg

IPL
has given new dimensions to Cricket .First IPL was a huge hit in monetary terms as well as an entertainment package also. When it was problematic to organize the IPL -2 in India due to security reasons. Then, it was made possible to organize the event in South Africa.

Though it was not that successful as compare to the first edition. And now the IPL fever is back in India and back with a bang. Though controversies are regular companion of IPL.

This time no news channel has the right to telecast the visuals of IPL .But here again here organizers has again find the solution and made a deal with you tube to telecast all the matches on their website. Though the, matches can been seen on the website but with a short delay of five minutes of actual status. So it would be a nice step to connect all the net savvy with IPL.

Source : Haryananews

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Shane Warne and Yusuf Pathan must perform for the Indian Premier League to succeed : IPL cricke


After three humdingers and one upset (Deccan Chargers beating fancied Chennai Super Kings in their own lair yesterday), Delhi Daredevils’ facile victory over Rajasthan Royals would have been a sign that the IPL was mellowing down after the first few days of unbridled hoopla. But Virender Sehwag’s smashing 75 off just 34 deliveries kept the sizzle alive.

What next in T20, a 17-ball hundred? If your math is not good enough, that implies 16 sixes and a four, and if that seems like an impossibility, try telling that to an Indian supporter, or indeed Sehwag himself. “Nothing is impossible if you have bat in hand,” he has said often. For the first 7-8 years of his career, few opponents believed him; now they are fearful.

Sehwag’s return to form coincided with Yusuf Pathan’s slump, so to speak. After his 37-ball hundred the other night, Pathan was the toast of the country. Monday’s match was billed as a contest between arguably the two biggest strikers of the ball, but where Sehwag, benefiting from a life, smashed 75, Pathan made a blob.

He is the son of a muezzin from the outskirts of Baroda, and a staunch practitioner of the faith. But even so Pathan would have marvelled at this dispensation of divinity. Somebody could, of course, tell him the old adage: that there is no greater leveller than cricket. Maybe that person should be his captain, Shane Warne, whose belief system may run diametrically opposite to that of Pathan, but who is a man of the world, and moreover knows this game to its greatest depths.
In the first two seasons, Warne enjoyed such success that he has become a cult figure in these parts of the world for his bowling and leadership qualities. In the first two matches this season, some of the sheen seems to be coming off. At 40, Warne’s right shoulder does not seem to have the same strength that it had at 38. He is still canny, a great motivator people, and a star attraction. But he has to win matches to keep the cult alive.

In the first season, Warne played cricket like he would poker, skill and bluff combining to deliver sensational wins. In the third, he is just playing cricket, and pretty ordinary stuff at that. These are still early times yet, and only a fool would write off Warne. But the charismatic leggie will need to script a different story from here to keep his status as the Wizard of Oz intact.

Meanwhile, Lalit Modi, commissioner of the IPL, through his tweets confirmed that Brian Lara was interested in playing Season 4. I have mixed feelings about this. To kick-start the IPL in 2008, especially with the threat of the ICL looming large, a heavy star quotient was necessary. Three years down the road, it need not be. The IPL must now aim to be a first rate tournament with the best practices in place, not a home for retirees or only a nursery for youngsters.

The best talent should find expression in the tournament, which means selection should be highly merited. If Lara – and I am only using him as an example – fits in, great; if he doesn’t tough luck. Star value and the entertainment quotient, so crucial to the success of the IPL yet, can only be extraneous to the game itself. What will ensure credibility in the long run is the quality of the product. In other words, the cricket played in the middle.After three humdingers and one upset (Deccan Chargers beating fancied Chennai Super Kings in their own lair yesterday), Delhi Daredevils’ facile victory over Rajasthan Royals would have been a sign that the IPL was mellowing down after the first few days of unbridled hoopla. But Virender Sehwag’s smashing 75 off just 34 deliveries kept the sizzle alive.

What next in T20, a 17-ball hundred? If your math is not good enough, that implies 16 sixes and a four, and if that seems like an impossibility, try telling that to an Indian supporter, or indeed Sehwag himself. “Nothing is impossible if you have bat in hand,” he has said often. For the first 7-8 years of his career, few opponents believed him; now they are fearful.

Sehwag’s return to form coincided with Yusuf Pathan’s slump, so to speak. After his 37-ball hundred the other night, Pathan was the toast of the country. Monday’s match was billed as a contest between arguably the two biggest strikers of the ball, but where Sehwag, benefiting from a life, smashed 75, Pathan made a blob.

He is the son of a muezzin from the outskirts of Baroda, and a staunch practitioner of the faith. But even so Pathan would have marvelled at this dispensation of divinity. Somebody could, of course, tell him the old adage: that there is no greater leveller than cricket. Maybe that person should be his captain, Shane Warne, whose belief system may run diametrically opposite to that of Pathan, but who is a man of the world, and moreover knows this game to its greatest depths.
In the first two seasons, Warne enjoyed such success that he has become a cult figure in these parts of the world for his bowling and leadership qualities. In the first two matches this season, some of the sheen seems to be coming off. At 40, Warne’s right shoulder does not seem to have the same strength that it had at 38. He is still canny, a great motivator people, and a star attraction. But he has to win matches to keep the cult alive.

In the first season, Warne played cricket like he would poker, skill and bluff combining to deliver sensational wins. In the third, he is just playing cricket, and pretty ordinary stuff at that. These are still early times yet, and only a fool would write off Warne. But the charismatic leggie will need to script a different story from here to keep his status as the Wizard of Oz intact.

Meanwhile, Lalit Modi, commissioner of the IPL, through his tweets confirmed that Brian Lara was interested in playing Season 4. I have mixed feelings about this. To kick-start the IPL in 2008, especially with the threat of the ICL looming large, a heavy star quotient was necessary. Three years down the road, it need not be. The IPL must now aim to be a first rate tournament with the best practices in place, not a home for retirees or only a nursery for youngsters.

The best talent should find expression in the tournament, which means selection should be highly merited. If Lara – and I am only using him as an example – fits in, great; if he doesn’t tough luck. Star value and the entertainment quotient, so crucial to the success of the IPL yet, can only be extraneous to the game itself. What will ensure credibility in the long run is the quality of the product. In other words, the cricket played in the middle.

Source : Blogs.Telegraph

Shane Warne and Yusuf Pathan must perform for the Indian Premier League to succeed : IPL cricke


After three humdingers and one upset (Deccan Chargers beating fancied Chennai Super Kings in their own lair yesterday), Delhi Daredevils’ facile victory over Rajasthan Royals would have been a sign that the IPL was mellowing down after the first few days of unbridled hoopla. But Virender Sehwag’s smashing 75 off just 34 deliveries kept the sizzle alive.

What next in T20, a 17-ball hundred? If your math is not good enough, that implies 16 sixes and a four, and if that seems like an impossibility, try telling that to an Indian supporter, or indeed Sehwag himself. “Nothing is impossible if you have bat in hand,” he has said often. For the first 7-8 years of his career, few opponents believed him; now they are fearful.

Sehwag’s return to form coincided with Yusuf Pathan’s slump, so to speak. After his 37-ball hundred the other night, Pathan was the toast of the country. Monday’s match was billed as a contest between arguably the two biggest strikers of the ball, but where Sehwag, benefiting from a life, smashed 75, Pathan made a blob.

He is the son of a muezzin from the outskirts of Baroda, and a staunch practitioner of the faith. But even so Pathan would have marvelled at this dispensation of divinity. Somebody could, of course, tell him the old adage: that there is no greater leveller than cricket. Maybe that person should be his captain, Shane Warne, whose belief system may run diametrically opposite to that of Pathan, but who is a man of the world, and moreover knows this game to its greatest depths.
In the first two seasons, Warne enjoyed such success that he has become a cult figure in these parts of the world for his bowling and leadership qualities. In the first two matches this season, some of the sheen seems to be coming off. At 40, Warne’s right shoulder does not seem to have the same strength that it had at 38. He is still canny, a great motivator people, and a star attraction. But he has to win matches to keep the cult alive.

In the first season, Warne played cricket like he would poker, skill and bluff combining to deliver sensational wins. In the third, he is just playing cricket, and pretty ordinary stuff at that. These are still early times yet, and only a fool would write off Warne. But the charismatic leggie will need to script a different story from here to keep his status as the Wizard of Oz intact.

Meanwhile, Lalit Modi, commissioner of the IPL, through his tweets confirmed that Brian Lara was interested in playing Season 4. I have mixed feelings about this. To kick-start the IPL in 2008, especially with the threat of the ICL looming large, a heavy star quotient was necessary. Three years down the road, it need not be. The IPL must now aim to be a first rate tournament with the best practices in place, not a home for retirees or only a nursery for youngsters.

The best talent should find expression in the tournament, which means selection should be highly merited. If Lara – and I am only using him as an example – fits in, great; if he doesn’t tough luck. Star value and the entertainment quotient, so crucial to the success of the IPL yet, can only be extraneous to the game itself. What will ensure credibility in the long run is the quality of the product. In other words, the cricket played in the middle.After three humdingers and one upset (Deccan Chargers beating fancied Chennai Super Kings in their own lair yesterday), Delhi Daredevils’ facile victory over Rajasthan Royals would have been a sign that the IPL was mellowing down after the first few days of unbridled hoopla. But Virender Sehwag’s smashing 75 off just 34 deliveries kept the sizzle alive.

What next in T20, a 17-ball hundred? If your math is not good enough, that implies 16 sixes and a four, and if that seems like an impossibility, try telling that to an Indian supporter, or indeed Sehwag himself. “Nothing is impossible if you have bat in hand,” he has said often. For the first 7-8 years of his career, few opponents believed him; now they are fearful.

Sehwag’s return to form coincided with Yusuf Pathan’s slump, so to speak. After his 37-ball hundred the other night, Pathan was the toast of the country. Monday’s match was billed as a contest between arguably the two biggest strikers of the ball, but where Sehwag, benefiting from a life, smashed 75, Pathan made a blob.

He is the son of a muezzin from the outskirts of Baroda, and a staunch practitioner of the faith. But even so Pathan would have marvelled at this dispensation of divinity. Somebody could, of course, tell him the old adage: that there is no greater leveller than cricket. Maybe that person should be his captain, Shane Warne, whose belief system may run diametrically opposite to that of Pathan, but who is a man of the world, and moreover knows this game to its greatest depths.
In the first two seasons, Warne enjoyed such success that he has become a cult figure in these parts of the world for his bowling and leadership qualities. In the first two matches this season, some of the sheen seems to be coming off. At 40, Warne’s right shoulder does not seem to have the same strength that it had at 38. He is still canny, a great motivator people, and a star attraction. But he has to win matches to keep the cult alive.

In the first season, Warne played cricket like he would poker, skill and bluff combining to deliver sensational wins. In the third, he is just playing cricket, and pretty ordinary stuff at that. These are still early times yet, and only a fool would write off Warne. But the charismatic leggie will need to script a different story from here to keep his status as the Wizard of Oz intact.

Meanwhile, Lalit Modi, commissioner of the IPL, through his tweets confirmed that Brian Lara was interested in playing Season 4. I have mixed feelings about this. To kick-start the IPL in 2008, especially with the threat of the ICL looming large, a heavy star quotient was necessary. Three years down the road, it need not be. The IPL must now aim to be a first rate tournament with the best practices in place, not a home for retirees or only a nursery for youngsters.

The best talent should find expression in the tournament, which means selection should be highly merited. If Lara – and I am only using him as an example – fits in, great; if he doesn’t tough luck. Star value and the entertainment quotient, so crucial to the success of the IPL yet, can only be extraneous to the game itself. What will ensure credibility in the long run is the quality of the product. In other words, the cricket played in the middle.

Source : Blogs.Telegraph