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Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Pakistan will miss services of five players in World Cup

Pakistan will miss the services of its top five players, including the suspended trio of Salman Butt, Mohammed Asif and Mohammed Aamer, in the upcoming cricket World Cup, sources said on Tuesday.

The sources said International Cricket Council (ICC) has advised the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) to not include players under suspicion in its preliminary 30-member squad, which has to be finalised by December 19.


The other two players, who are to likely to miss the bus are stumper Kamran Akmal and leg-spinner Danish Kaneria.

“The advice is not to select these two while the suspended trio of Salman Butt, Muhammad Asif and Muhammad Aamer are also out of contention for the World Cup,” one source told PTI.

The source said the PCB had tried to get clearance for selecting Akmal but did not get a favorable response from the sport’s world governing body.

“There is fear in the cricket hierarchy that with doubts still existing over the conduct of Akmal, Kaneria and the suspended trio also under a spot-fixing cloud, these five should not be selected in the World Cup preliminary squad,” the source said.

Sources also said that there was also some doubt over former captain Shoaib Malik, who has scored three successive hundreds in the ongoing domestic season.

“There is 50-50 chance of Malik making the preliminary squad but 95 per chance that Akmal and Kaneria are out of contention,” the source said.

The Boards have to submit their preliminary squads of 30 to the ICC by December 19 and the final-15 after a month.

Salman Butt, Aamer and Asif were provisionally suspended by the ICC after allegations surfaced that they took money to bowl deliberate no balls during the Lord’s Test against England.

“The PCB and its selectors are in the process of finalising the squad for the New Zealand tour and the World Cup preliminary squad and several meetings have been held in this regard involving chief selector Mohsin Khan, coach Waqar Younis and manager Intikhab Alam with PCB Chairman Ijaz Butt,” the source said.

He said without ICC clearance and approval the PCB, faced with spot—fixing controversy, was not in a position to induct players still under a cloud of suspicion.

A former Test player said if the selectors were not able to pick the suspended trio and Akmal and Kaneria it would be a big blow to Pakistan cricket team.

“They are all senior players and the absence of Akmal and Kaneria would be a big setback for the team, it will hard finding their replacements,” he said.

Akmal and Kaneria had also missed out on just concluded series against South Africa in the UAE. The board had not explained their ouster.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Pakistan will miss services of five players in World Cup

Pakistan will miss the services of its top five players, including the suspended trio of Salman Butt, Mohammed Asif and Mohammed Aamer, in the upcoming cricket World Cup, sources said on Tuesday.

The sources said International Cricket Council (ICC) has advised the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) to not include players under suspicion in its preliminary 30-member squad, which has to be finalised by December 19.


The other two players, who are to likely to miss the bus are stumper Kamran Akmal and leg-spinner Danish Kaneria.

“The advice is not to select these two while the suspended trio of Salman Butt, Muhammad Asif and Muhammad Aamer are also out of contention for the World Cup,” one source told PTI.

The source said the PCB had tried to get clearance for selecting Akmal but did not get a favorable response from the sport’s world governing body.

“There is fear in the cricket hierarchy that with doubts still existing over the conduct of Akmal, Kaneria and the suspended trio also under a spot-fixing cloud, these five should not be selected in the World Cup preliminary squad,” the source said.

Sources also said that there was also some doubt over former captain Shoaib Malik, who has scored three successive hundreds in the ongoing domestic season.

“There is 50-50 chance of Malik making the preliminary squad but 95 per chance that Akmal and Kaneria are out of contention,” the source said.

The Boards have to submit their preliminary squads of 30 to the ICC by December 19 and the final-15 after a month.

Salman Butt, Aamer and Asif were provisionally suspended by the ICC after allegations surfaced that they took money to bowl deliberate no balls during the Lord’s Test against England.

“The PCB and its selectors are in the process of finalising the squad for the New Zealand tour and the World Cup preliminary squad and several meetings have been held in this regard involving chief selector Mohsin Khan, coach Waqar Younis and manager Intikhab Alam with PCB Chairman Ijaz Butt,” the source said.

He said without ICC clearance and approval the PCB, faced with spot—fixing controversy, was not in a position to induct players still under a cloud of suspicion.

A former Test player said if the selectors were not able to pick the suspended trio and Akmal and Kaneria it would be a big blow to Pakistan cricket team.

“They are all senior players and the absence of Akmal and Kaneria would be a big setback for the team, it will hard finding their replacements,” he said.

Akmal and Kaneria had also missed out on just concluded series against South Africa in the UAE. The board had not explained their ouster.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Ashes Twitter girl bowled over

An American woman has been pestered by Twitter cricket fans - because her screen name is "theashes".
Ashley Kerekes, 22, whose boyfriend gave her the name, has been bombarded with messages wanting updates.
She got so annoyed she wrote: "I am not a freaking cricket match!" Her anger faded when she gained 7,000 followers and became a celebrity. Now airline Qantas has offered her flights to watch the series.
Ashley, from Massachusetts, wrote: "This has been insane. Howzat. I'm off to bed."

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Ashes Twitter girl bowled over

An American woman has been pestered by Twitter cricket fans - because her screen name is "theashes".
Ashley Kerekes, 22, whose boyfriend gave her the name, has been bombarded with messages wanting updates.
She got so annoyed she wrote: "I am not a freaking cricket match!" Her anger faded when she gained 7,000 followers and became a celebrity. Now airline Qantas has offered her flights to watch the series.
Ashley, from Massachusetts, wrote: "This has been insane. Howzat. I'm off to bed."

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

No UDRS in South Africa-India Test series

The Umpire Decision Review System (UDRS) will not be a part of India's upcoming Test tour of South Africa. Gerald Majola, chief executive of Cricket South Africa confirmed the news to ESPNcricinfo saying, "(We) will definitely not be using it."

Majola who was in Dubai for the ICC Chief Executives Conference did not explain what had led to the decision but a CSA official said the main reason was, "India are not keen to use it".


Corrie van Zyl, the South Africa coach, said his team had been expecting this development, given India's stance on the issue. South Africa have used the UDRS in other home series, most recently against England in 2009-10. "We are not going to use it and thats the end of it," he said. "I like UDRS and it does eradicate a lot of decisions that are wrong, which can only be good for the game.

"I'm not disappointed, I almost knew it was not going to happen in any case, so it's not a major disappointment, and it will still be a very good series without it."

Graeme Smith, the South Africa captain, had said in October that the UDRS needed to be implemented consistently and that technology was the way forward in cricket. "I think if the UDRS is going to be successful it needs to be implemented properly by the ICC and not on a 50-50 basis like we have seen so far," he had said. "It must be used all of the time and not for selective series' like we see now."

India have played a series in which the UDRS was used only once - in Sri Lanka in 2008. They struggled with their referrals on that tour, getting only one review right, while Sri Lanka successfully challenged 11 decisions. Since then the UDRS has been used in Australia, South Africa, England, New Zealand and West Indies and has found favour with several captains and players. The Indians and the BCCI, however, are firmly opposed to the system, even though the ICC have approved its use in principle during the 2011 World Cup.

MS Dhoni, the India captain, reiterated his reluctance to accept the system during the recent home series against New Zealand, calling for the standard of on-field umpiring to be improved instead.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

No UDRS in South Africa-India Test series

The Umpire Decision Review System (UDRS) will not be a part of India's upcoming Test tour of South Africa. Gerald Majola, chief executive of Cricket South Africa confirmed the news to ESPNcricinfo saying, "(We) will definitely not be using it."

Majola who was in Dubai for the ICC Chief Executives Conference did not explain what had led to the decision but a CSA official said the main reason was, "India are not keen to use it".


Corrie van Zyl, the South Africa coach, said his team had been expecting this development, given India's stance on the issue. South Africa have used the UDRS in other home series, most recently against England in 2009-10. "We are not going to use it and thats the end of it," he said. "I like UDRS and it does eradicate a lot of decisions that are wrong, which can only be good for the game.

"I'm not disappointed, I almost knew it was not going to happen in any case, so it's not a major disappointment, and it will still be a very good series without it."

Graeme Smith, the South Africa captain, had said in October that the UDRS needed to be implemented consistently and that technology was the way forward in cricket. "I think if the UDRS is going to be successful it needs to be implemented properly by the ICC and not on a 50-50 basis like we have seen so far," he had said. "It must be used all of the time and not for selective series' like we see now."

India have played a series in which the UDRS was used only once - in Sri Lanka in 2008. They struggled with their referrals on that tour, getting only one review right, while Sri Lanka successfully challenged 11 decisions. Since then the UDRS has been used in Australia, South Africa, England, New Zealand and West Indies and has found favour with several captains and players. The Indians and the BCCI, however, are firmly opposed to the system, even though the ICC have approved its use in principle during the 2011 World Cup.

MS Dhoni, the India captain, reiterated his reluctance to accept the system during the recent home series against New Zealand, calling for the standard of on-field umpiring to be improved instead.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

"Street fighter" Miandad's charge as batting consultant big boost to Pak team: Akram

Former Pakistan cricket captain Wasim Akram has welcomed the Pakistan Cricket Board's decision to appoint the current Director General of the board, Javed Miandad, as the batting consultant of the national team.

"Javed Miandad is a hard-working man. Then he knows the ins and outs of batting technique. He is one of the greats of his times. So it's nice to have a big name like him in the side. He is street fighter and players should learn from him," the Daily Times quoted Akram, as saying.


Akram however added that chief coach Waqar Younis, bowling advisor Aaquib Javed and Miandad would have to "work together to build the future of Pakistan cricket".

"If Waqar, Aaquib and Miandad could combine well then Pakistan will immensely benefit from their experience. They can do wonders for Pakistan cricket as long as they stick together," Akram told a sports channel.

That the Misbahul Haq-led Pakistan side played well against South Africa in the recently concluded two-Test series in the UAE was a "good omen," felt the legendary left arm fast bowler.
"It was a good omen for Pakistan cricket that they drew the series against one of the top sides of the world," Akram said.
Misbah scored an unbeaten 76 in the first Test, while the 36-year-old batsman managed to garner 77 and a dogged 58 not out to rescue Pakistan in the second Test as well.
"Misbah played good cricket and displayed some exemplary leadership qualities. I believed that he was a stop-gap arrangement for Pakistan, but if he is given more time, he will surely do well in the job," Akram opined.

He also expressed his happiness over the inclusion of former captain Younus Khan, who hit an unbeaten 131 in the first Test against Proteas in the UAE.

"Younus returning to the side is a big plus for Pakistan. He is a senior player, who played well in the Test matches as well. He will be a good No.3 or No.4 in the batting order. Younus' presence will be of great help when chasing big scores," said Akram. (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

"Street fighter" Miandad's charge as batting consultant big boost to Pak team: Akram

Former Pakistan cricket captain Wasim Akram has welcomed the Pakistan Cricket Board's decision to appoint the current Director General of the board, Javed Miandad, as the batting consultant of the national team.

"Javed Miandad is a hard-working man. Then he knows the ins and outs of batting technique. He is one of the greats of his times. So it's nice to have a big name like him in the side. He is street fighter and players should learn from him," the Daily Times quoted Akram, as saying.


Akram however added that chief coach Waqar Younis, bowling advisor Aaquib Javed and Miandad would have to "work together to build the future of Pakistan cricket".

"If Waqar, Aaquib and Miandad could combine well then Pakistan will immensely benefit from their experience. They can do wonders for Pakistan cricket as long as they stick together," Akram told a sports channel.

That the Misbahul Haq-led Pakistan side played well against South Africa in the recently concluded two-Test series in the UAE was a "good omen," felt the legendary left arm fast bowler.
"It was a good omen for Pakistan cricket that they drew the series against one of the top sides of the world," Akram said.
Misbah scored an unbeaten 76 in the first Test, while the 36-year-old batsman managed to garner 77 and a dogged 58 not out to rescue Pakistan in the second Test as well.
"Misbah played good cricket and displayed some exemplary leadership qualities. I believed that he was a stop-gap arrangement for Pakistan, but if he is given more time, he will surely do well in the job," Akram opined.

He also expressed his happiness over the inclusion of former captain Younus Khan, who hit an unbeaten 131 in the first Test against Proteas in the UAE.

"Younus returning to the side is a big plus for Pakistan. He is a senior player, who played well in the Test matches as well. He will be a good No.3 or No.4 in the batting order. Younus' presence will be of great help when chasing big scores," said Akram. (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Monday, November 29, 2010

World’s largest cricket tournament gets underway in Himachal Pradesh

Even as cricket fever builds up for the 2011 World Cup that will see 16 teams in action, cricket lovers in the state of Himachal Pradesh are already enjoying a treat of sorts as no less than 1342 teams are in action in a local T20 tournament. This is absolutely staggering and tells us why cricket is a religion in India

Shimla: The second edition of the Jaypee Twenty20 'Mahasangram', a local version of Twenty20 league and billed as the world's largest cricket tournament, began in Himachal Pradesh Monday, an organiser said here.


The knock-out tournament that would see 1,342 teams playing, mainly from rural areas across the state, began this morning. The inaugural matches were played at Kalpa (in Kinnaur district), Dharamsala (in Kangra district), Nadaun (in Hamirpur district), Kullu and Bilaspur. Speaking on the occasion, Mohit Sood, Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association (HPCA) press secretary said, "This is a great chance for many cricket loving kids to showcase their skills and we are very excited a tournament of this magnitude is taking place within our purview".

Releasing the schedule of the tournament, Mohit said 150 matches would be played daily at 75 grounds that have been improved and developed by the HPCA. "Nearly 19,000 players would showcase their cricketing skills in the tournament that would see 2,000 matches. Around 500 officials of various cricket bodies are on duty to supervise the matches," Sood added.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

World’s largest cricket tournament gets underway in Himachal Pradesh

Even as cricket fever builds up for the 2011 World Cup that will see 16 teams in action, cricket lovers in the state of Himachal Pradesh are already enjoying a treat of sorts as no less than 1342 teams are in action in a local T20 tournament. This is absolutely staggering and tells us why cricket is a religion in India

Shimla: The second edition of the Jaypee Twenty20 'Mahasangram', a local version of Twenty20 league and billed as the world's largest cricket tournament, began in Himachal Pradesh Monday, an organiser said here.


The knock-out tournament that would see 1,342 teams playing, mainly from rural areas across the state, began this morning. The inaugural matches were played at Kalpa (in Kinnaur district), Dharamsala (in Kangra district), Nadaun (in Hamirpur district), Kullu and Bilaspur. Speaking on the occasion, Mohit Sood, Himachal Pradesh Cricket Association (HPCA) press secretary said, "This is a great chance for many cricket loving kids to showcase their skills and we are very excited a tournament of this magnitude is taking place within our purview".

Releasing the schedule of the tournament, Mohit said 150 matches would be played daily at 75 grounds that have been improved and developed by the HPCA. "Nearly 19,000 players would showcase their cricketing skills in the tournament that would see 2,000 matches. Around 500 officials of various cricket bodies are on duty to supervise the matches," Sood added.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Dud contests will put Test cricket on a road to ruin

Despite its records and changes of mood, the Gabba Test ended in a dull draw. Certainly, it had its ups and downs but distant observers will conclude that the pitch was flat, the bowling weak, the ball soft and the last few days hardly worth the bother. Sessions passed without a wicket falling. People went to work and came back and found the same fellows in occupation. Two men were dismissed on the last two days. It is not good enough.

After the match, captains and commentators alike talked about a fantastic contest. And it did contain some memorable moments, individual triumphs that told of a human journey reaching its destination. Certainly, the batting was impressive, and a hat-trick was taken, yet to call the match exciting was to stretch a point. Ricky Ponting described it as "tremendous" while Andrew Strauss spoke about a "great match". Gentlemen, with respect, that is a delusion.


Advertisement: Story continues below
Players and media live inside a bubble. Those steeped in a game can ignore its weaknesses. Love is blind. No one watching bowlers easily repulsed on a fifth-day deck could feel any such complacency. No one surveying the empty stands on the final days could be confident the game was on the right path. The Barmy Army enlivened proceedings with cheerful chants. Otherwise the ground might as well have been empty.

Cricket cannot afford many triumphs of this sort. Tests on the subcontinent often produce lop-sided scorecards so that they become a collection of figures leading nowhere. If the habit spreads to Australia then the game is digging its own grave. Results are important. The contest between bat and ball needs to be hard fought. Sport relies on the unwritten script, the power of the unpredictable. Tension is its lifeblood.

For all the excitement felt in both camps the fact remains that a draw was inevitable at the Gabba from a long way out. Between them the weather and the freshness of the track brought a flurry of wickets early in the match. Thereafter it went to sleep. The bat dominated the second part of an uneven contest. The scores were huge. England might have reached 1000. Bear in mind that Don Bradman and Wally Hammond were not playing. The batting of these sides is competent as opposed to daunting.

Recent Ashes series have produced lots of results. Some have been one-sided as the Australians overwhelmed inadequate opponents. Series played in England, though, were close, and attracted intense interest around the world. Stalemates were few and far between. It's difficult to recall any staged in the past quarter of a century. Even the draws were compelling.

However, cricket need only look a little further back to find examples of sterility. In 1964, Australia won the series 1-0, and the other matches were dreary. Bob Simpson scored 311 at Old Trafford, and Ken Barrington replied with 256, and that was the end of it. Much the same happened in 1968 as Bill Lawry's side set out to avoid defeat. Meanwhile, Carnaby Street and the Beatles were cheering people up. Cricket was old hat. Recognising the problem, the game turned towards one-day contests and not so much a saviour as a reviver.

Australia and England ought not to kid themselves about this confrontation. If the pitches in Adelaide and Perth are docile, and the matches peter out, then the game will suffer. A narrow audience might find the exchanges fascinating but the wider community will look elsewhere. The rivalry might hold connoisseurs and fanatics but eventually the lack of entertainment will have an impact.

Australia needs to stage not only a tight Ashes series but also an eventful one. England has overseen two glorious editions, the epic of 2005 and the taut contest four years later. On both occasions, spectators were constantly on tenterhooks. Australia were slightly the better side but England enjoyed home advantage. Fortunes ebbed and flowed.

Now the tables are turned. England might be a little stronger. Accordingly, the battle between the sides could be close, and that is important. However, can the same be confidently forecast about the struggle between bat and ball? If the pitches are slow, and the balls go soft after 20 overs, then the matches will be slow moving. Does cricket really want to go to Boxing Day with the score at 0-0?

Part of the problem lies with the quality of the bowlers, and that is beyond cricket's immediate control. However, the emphasis on ensuring matches last five days is a mistake. Lively first-day tracks are essential.

Obviously, it is a bit early to start worrying about a deadening series. But the warning signs cannot be missed. The Gabba Test was not a great match. Ultimately, it was a dud.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Dud contests will put Test cricket on a road to ruin

Despite its records and changes of mood, the Gabba Test ended in a dull draw. Certainly, it had its ups and downs but distant observers will conclude that the pitch was flat, the bowling weak, the ball soft and the last few days hardly worth the bother. Sessions passed without a wicket falling. People went to work and came back and found the same fellows in occupation. Two men were dismissed on the last two days. It is not good enough.

After the match, captains and commentators alike talked about a fantastic contest. And it did contain some memorable moments, individual triumphs that told of a human journey reaching its destination. Certainly, the batting was impressive, and a hat-trick was taken, yet to call the match exciting was to stretch a point. Ricky Ponting described it as "tremendous" while Andrew Strauss spoke about a "great match". Gentlemen, with respect, that is a delusion.


Advertisement: Story continues below
Players and media live inside a bubble. Those steeped in a game can ignore its weaknesses. Love is blind. No one watching bowlers easily repulsed on a fifth-day deck could feel any such complacency. No one surveying the empty stands on the final days could be confident the game was on the right path. The Barmy Army enlivened proceedings with cheerful chants. Otherwise the ground might as well have been empty.

Cricket cannot afford many triumphs of this sort. Tests on the subcontinent often produce lop-sided scorecards so that they become a collection of figures leading nowhere. If the habit spreads to Australia then the game is digging its own grave. Results are important. The contest between bat and ball needs to be hard fought. Sport relies on the unwritten script, the power of the unpredictable. Tension is its lifeblood.

For all the excitement felt in both camps the fact remains that a draw was inevitable at the Gabba from a long way out. Between them the weather and the freshness of the track brought a flurry of wickets early in the match. Thereafter it went to sleep. The bat dominated the second part of an uneven contest. The scores were huge. England might have reached 1000. Bear in mind that Don Bradman and Wally Hammond were not playing. The batting of these sides is competent as opposed to daunting.

Recent Ashes series have produced lots of results. Some have been one-sided as the Australians overwhelmed inadequate opponents. Series played in England, though, were close, and attracted intense interest around the world. Stalemates were few and far between. It's difficult to recall any staged in the past quarter of a century. Even the draws were compelling.

However, cricket need only look a little further back to find examples of sterility. In 1964, Australia won the series 1-0, and the other matches were dreary. Bob Simpson scored 311 at Old Trafford, and Ken Barrington replied with 256, and that was the end of it. Much the same happened in 1968 as Bill Lawry's side set out to avoid defeat. Meanwhile, Carnaby Street and the Beatles were cheering people up. Cricket was old hat. Recognising the problem, the game turned towards one-day contests and not so much a saviour as a reviver.

Australia and England ought not to kid themselves about this confrontation. If the pitches in Adelaide and Perth are docile, and the matches peter out, then the game will suffer. A narrow audience might find the exchanges fascinating but the wider community will look elsewhere. The rivalry might hold connoisseurs and fanatics but eventually the lack of entertainment will have an impact.

Australia needs to stage not only a tight Ashes series but also an eventful one. England has overseen two glorious editions, the epic of 2005 and the taut contest four years later. On both occasions, spectators were constantly on tenterhooks. Australia were slightly the better side but England enjoyed home advantage. Fortunes ebbed and flowed.

Now the tables are turned. England might be a little stronger. Accordingly, the battle between the sides could be close, and that is important. However, can the same be confidently forecast about the struggle between bat and ball? If the pitches are slow, and the balls go soft after 20 overs, then the matches will be slow moving. Does cricket really want to go to Boxing Day with the score at 0-0?

Part of the problem lies with the quality of the bowlers, and that is beyond cricket's immediate control. However, the emphasis on ensuring matches last five days is a mistake. Lively first-day tracks are essential.

Obviously, it is a bit early to start worrying about a deadening series. But the warning signs cannot be missed. The Gabba Test was not a great match. Ultimately, it was a dud.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Woman: 'I am not a freaking cricket match!'

She's Australia's - and England's - latest cricketing celebrity, but 22-year-old American Ashley Kerekes has never lifted a cricket bat.
The young Massachusetts babysitter, originally from Maine, became an instant Twitter celebrity when she declared to the world: "I AM NOT A FREAKING CRICKET MATCH!!!".

Ms Kerekes wrote the tweet in response to cricket-related messages due to her Twitter username, @TheAshes.


Ms Kerekes told brisbanetimes.com.au what happened next hit her for six.

"I was out Christmas shopping with my aunt and I got a Twitter [direct message] from a friend of mine telling me that some guy was trying to get information about me," she said.

"I'd turned off notifications on my phone right after my first outburst so I had no idea. After that I went looking around and found that I had hundreds, maybe thousands, of messages about The Ashes."

Ms Kerekes had about 300 followers at the start of the first Test at the Gabba. As of this afternoon, she had more than 5200.

And it was all thanks to a username that had more to do with her given name than a biennial cricketing contest between Australia and England.

"My boyfriend gave me the nickname years ago, maybe because of the cricket tournament. We don't remember. He's been calling me The Ashes forever," Ms Kerekes said.

"When we started Twitter accounts back in 2007, before Twitter was cool, it was just something we used back and forth so I used my nickname he gave me."

Ms Kerekes said despite the confusion she would never change her username and said becoming an overnight Twitter celebrity was "amazing".

"I've been into social media for a long time, but I was never this popular," Ms Kerekes said.

Ms Kerekes said even her mother was getting in on the action.

"She thinks it's amazing that her daughter is getting famous for making a bitchy comment," she said.

"But now she's known for being even bitchier on twitter! So now everyone knows where I got it from."

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

ICC poised to dump Champions Trophy for new Future Tours Program

After the ICC board approved the creation of Test and limited overs championship leagues, the governing body's chief executives committee will meet in Dubai to mull over the details.

According to Fox Sports, committee members are expected to push for the removal of the Champions Trophy to allow room for the Test championship semis and final to be contested once every four years.
"The restructure of international cricket has been a significant and strategic piece of work which now requires a new Future Tours Program (FTP) Agreement incorporating league rules and regulations to be discussed and approved," ICC Chief Executive Haroon Lorgat said.
"The present ICC directors and Chief Executives have recognized their essential role in shaping the future strategy of the ICC and the game," he added.

Originally launched as a revenue raiser and also a lightweight event that could be played in a wider variety of locales than the more cumbersome World Cup, the Champions Trophy has been edged to the fringes of an increasingly cramped calendar by Twenty20 cricket, the report said.

It was inaugurated as the ICC Knock Out tournament in 1998, and has been played every two years since, changing its name to the Champions Trophy in 2002. (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Woman: 'I am not a freaking cricket match!'

She's Australia's - and England's - latest cricketing celebrity, but 22-year-old American Ashley Kerekes has never lifted a cricket bat.
The young Massachusetts babysitter, originally from Maine, became an instant Twitter celebrity when she declared to the world: "I AM NOT A FREAKING CRICKET MATCH!!!".

Ms Kerekes wrote the tweet in response to cricket-related messages due to her Twitter username, @TheAshes.


Ms Kerekes told brisbanetimes.com.au what happened next hit her for six.

"I was out Christmas shopping with my aunt and I got a Twitter [direct message] from a friend of mine telling me that some guy was trying to get information about me," she said.

"I'd turned off notifications on my phone right after my first outburst so I had no idea. After that I went looking around and found that I had hundreds, maybe thousands, of messages about The Ashes."

Ms Kerekes had about 300 followers at the start of the first Test at the Gabba. As of this afternoon, she had more than 5200.

And it was all thanks to a username that had more to do with her given name than a biennial cricketing contest between Australia and England.

"My boyfriend gave me the nickname years ago, maybe because of the cricket tournament. We don't remember. He's been calling me The Ashes forever," Ms Kerekes said.

"When we started Twitter accounts back in 2007, before Twitter was cool, it was just something we used back and forth so I used my nickname he gave me."

Ms Kerekes said despite the confusion she would never change her username and said becoming an overnight Twitter celebrity was "amazing".

"I've been into social media for a long time, but I was never this popular," Ms Kerekes said.

Ms Kerekes said even her mother was getting in on the action.

"She thinks it's amazing that her daughter is getting famous for making a bitchy comment," she said.

"But now she's known for being even bitchier on twitter! So now everyone knows where I got it from."

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

ICC poised to dump Champions Trophy for new Future Tours Program

After the ICC board approved the creation of Test and limited overs championship leagues, the governing body's chief executives committee will meet in Dubai to mull over the details.

According to Fox Sports, committee members are expected to push for the removal of the Champions Trophy to allow room for the Test championship semis and final to be contested once every four years.
"The restructure of international cricket has been a significant and strategic piece of work which now requires a new Future Tours Program (FTP) Agreement incorporating league rules and regulations to be discussed and approved," ICC Chief Executive Haroon Lorgat said.
"The present ICC directors and Chief Executives have recognized their essential role in shaping the future strategy of the ICC and the game," he added.

Originally launched as a revenue raiser and also a lightweight event that could be played in a wider variety of locales than the more cumbersome World Cup, the Champions Trophy has been edged to the fringes of an increasingly cramped calendar by Twenty20 cricket, the report said.

It was inaugurated as the ICC Knock Out tournament in 1998, and has been played every two years since, changing its name to the Champions Trophy in 2002. (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Saturday, November 27, 2010

Flower out, Butterworth in

Zimbabwe Cricket last week announced a 15-man squad to tour Bangladesh as preparations for next year’s International Cricket Council World Cup gathered momentum. (Pictured: Grant Flower)

In-form all-rounder, Ryan Butterworth, received his first call up while there was no place in the side for returning veteran Grant Flower.

The 29-year-old Butterworth showed excellent form in the recent Twenty20 domestic competition to earn his call-up for the five-match series. ?



“Grant Flower, who returned to the squad for the South Africa series, is missing from the line-up, while Sean Williams is missing through injury,” Zimbabwe Cricket said from Harare last week.


Zimbabwe will later this month play Asian rivals Bangladesh in a series of One Day Internationals in preparation for the ICC 2011 World Cup scheduled for February.

Zimbabwe are in a relatively tough group in the ICC’s flagship event. They are pooled alongside defending champions Australia , high-flying New Zealand , co-hosts Sri Lanka and Canada .

Their trickiest match is the opening one against The Aussies at the Mahindra Rajapaska International Cricket Stadium in Hambantonta , Sri Lanka on February 20.

Zimbabwe squad: Elton Chigumbura (captain), Tatenda Taibu (wk), Brendan Taylor, Hamilton Masakadza, Shingi Masakadza, Regis Chakabva, Chamu Chibhabha, Raymond Price, Ryan Butterworth, Craig Ervine, Prosper Utseya, Graeme Cremer, Keith Dabengwa, Chris Mpofu, Keegan Meth

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Flower out, Butterworth in

Zimbabwe Cricket last week announced a 15-man squad to tour Bangladesh as preparations for next year’s International Cricket Council World Cup gathered momentum. (Pictured: Grant Flower)

In-form all-rounder, Ryan Butterworth, received his first call up while there was no place in the side for returning veteran Grant Flower.

The 29-year-old Butterworth showed excellent form in the recent Twenty20 domestic competition to earn his call-up for the five-match series. ?



“Grant Flower, who returned to the squad for the South Africa series, is missing from the line-up, while Sean Williams is missing through injury,” Zimbabwe Cricket said from Harare last week.


Zimbabwe will later this month play Asian rivals Bangladesh in a series of One Day Internationals in preparation for the ICC 2011 World Cup scheduled for February.

Zimbabwe are in a relatively tough group in the ICC’s flagship event. They are pooled alongside defending champions Australia , high-flying New Zealand , co-hosts Sri Lanka and Canada .

Their trickiest match is the opening one against The Aussies at the Mahindra Rajapaska International Cricket Stadium in Hambantonta , Sri Lanka on February 20.

Zimbabwe squad: Elton Chigumbura (captain), Tatenda Taibu (wk), Brendan Taylor, Hamilton Masakadza, Shingi Masakadza, Regis Chakabva, Chamu Chibhabha, Raymond Price, Ryan Butterworth, Craig Ervine, Prosper Utseya, Graeme Cremer, Keith Dabengwa, Chris Mpofu, Keegan Meth

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Penalise Ijaz Butt not Pakistan Cricket

The ICC has put forward an order for Pakistan Cricket to put the house in order. Reform or be expelled is the request. For any fervent ICC observers, this is an appalling statement. This is because the organisation is a serial crowd when it comes to confronting its own members.

For the fans of cricket in Pakistan, the atrocious news is that their cricket could be barred from international circle. Amidst this catalogue of revelations, the least abysmal is that Pakistan Cricket Board is in a proficient mess. This is only cricket board, because the domestic cricket in Pakistan has shown that the sport is pretty much alive.

It is the first time that the statement from the ICC is lucid. It will take stern action to trudge out corruption, and PCB is the one singled out. Seems like the Pakistan cricket board is the number one basket case. The stance from the ICC is a good gesture, although coming through a bit late.
This is also convivial that the organisation is censuring a dysfunctional cricket board even though it happens to be the PCB. Yet major issues are present and need to be addressed by the ICC on urgent basis.

The PCB seems to be an easy objective, secluded and friendless the international arena. Would the ICC have taken a rather central member to task on the same echelon? Precedent has been established and one can just hope the answer to be positive of the above question. But how will ICC act if India, for example, brought the game into disrepute?

The fans of Pakistan cricket might argue that the ICC has not gone far enough. There is no explanation on what is Ijaz Butt is allowed at the board table following his outrageous behaviour? Here lies the complexity of the whole issue, should one man’s ineptness licensed to obliterate a country’s cricket?

In actual terms, who does Mr. Ijaz Butt signify? Does he really represent Pakistan cricket? The chairman of the board was not elected, nor promoted through merit. He does not come following a process, but is imposed on the seat by the head of the state.

On a realistic standing, Mr. Butt runs the affairs at the board in a dictatorial manner. Many of the former players consider his tenure to be full of mistakes and the worst in history. Pakistan cricket is run by a person who only speaks for himself according to the majority.

It is not just the denting strategies of the chairman affecting the board, but also his blatant overrules in case of appointments. The selection panel does not select anyone, he does. Many at the board have resigned due to his interference. The recent resignation by the chairman of the Senate Committee on Sports is an example of that. Mr Butt refused to appear before the committee and the chairman at last decided to quit.

So what does Ijaz Butt stand for? He certainly seems to be a representative of the politicised cricket administration. That being the case, ICC should take a strict action against the chairman rather than penalising Pakistan cricket. Why should millions of fans suffer at the hands of one man’s ego and maladministration?

Yes Pakistan cricket requires root and branch reforms. But it is Pakistan cricket that requires all the help too and not Ijaz Butt. On the contrary punishment should not fall in line for Pakistan cricket; it is the chairman that who needs to be penalised.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Penalise Ijaz Butt not Pakistan Cricket

The ICC has put forward an order for Pakistan Cricket to put the house in order. Reform or be expelled is the request. For any fervent ICC observers, this is an appalling statement. This is because the organisation is a serial crowd when it comes to confronting its own members.

For the fans of cricket in Pakistan, the atrocious news is that their cricket could be barred from international circle. Amidst this catalogue of revelations, the least abysmal is that Pakistan Cricket Board is in a proficient mess. This is only cricket board, because the domestic cricket in Pakistan has shown that the sport is pretty much alive.

It is the first time that the statement from the ICC is lucid. It will take stern action to trudge out corruption, and PCB is the one singled out. Seems like the Pakistan cricket board is the number one basket case. The stance from the ICC is a good gesture, although coming through a bit late.
This is also convivial that the organisation is censuring a dysfunctional cricket board even though it happens to be the PCB. Yet major issues are present and need to be addressed by the ICC on urgent basis.

The PCB seems to be an easy objective, secluded and friendless the international arena. Would the ICC have taken a rather central member to task on the same echelon? Precedent has been established and one can just hope the answer to be positive of the above question. But how will ICC act if India, for example, brought the game into disrepute?

The fans of Pakistan cricket might argue that the ICC has not gone far enough. There is no explanation on what is Ijaz Butt is allowed at the board table following his outrageous behaviour? Here lies the complexity of the whole issue, should one man’s ineptness licensed to obliterate a country’s cricket?

In actual terms, who does Mr. Ijaz Butt signify? Does he really represent Pakistan cricket? The chairman of the board was not elected, nor promoted through merit. He does not come following a process, but is imposed on the seat by the head of the state.

On a realistic standing, Mr. Butt runs the affairs at the board in a dictatorial manner. Many of the former players consider his tenure to be full of mistakes and the worst in history. Pakistan cricket is run by a person who only speaks for himself according to the majority.

It is not just the denting strategies of the chairman affecting the board, but also his blatant overrules in case of appointments. The selection panel does not select anyone, he does. Many at the board have resigned due to his interference. The recent resignation by the chairman of the Senate Committee on Sports is an example of that. Mr Butt refused to appear before the committee and the chairman at last decided to quit.

So what does Ijaz Butt stand for? He certainly seems to be a representative of the politicised cricket administration. That being the case, ICC should take a strict action against the chairman rather than penalising Pakistan cricket. Why should millions of fans suffer at the hands of one man’s ego and maladministration?

Yes Pakistan cricket requires root and branch reforms. But it is Pakistan cricket that requires all the help too and not Ijaz Butt. On the contrary punishment should not fall in line for Pakistan cricket; it is the chairman that who needs to be penalised.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

"Yousuf should concentrate only on Test cricket": Moin Khan

Check out Which Cricketer is Driving Which Car! Zigwheels.com/Cricketers-Cars
Former Pakistan cricket captain Mohammad Yousuf should focus only on the Test format of the game, his compatriot and former wicketkeeper Moin Khan has said.

"Yousuf should concentrate only on Test cricket," PakPassion.net quoted Moin, as saying.

He felt that Yousuf does not warrant selection in the Pakistan World Cup Squad due to being dogged by injuries of late, and although he was selected for the recently concluded ODI series against South Africa in UAE, he was only able to play the final game before being ruled out of the Test series against the Proteas after picking up a recurrence of his old groin injury.


"How can you select a player (for the final ODI) who has fitness issues and he has just recovered, and arrived in the UAE ahead of a young guy who has been playing well."

Moin was of the view that the rigours of One-day Internationals and Twenty20 cricket were no longer for the Pakistani batting stalwart, and that his spot should be filled by the young and impressive right-hand top order batsman, Asad Shafiq.

"Yousuf has a lot of fitness issues and a young player like Asad should get a chance. Asad was playing well in the ODI against South Africa but for some reason he was dropped for Yousuf."

As the cricket world prepares for the World Cup event to be held in the subcontinent next year, Moin was circumspect on Pakistan's chances.

"PCB have made a lot of mess. The team should have been finalised 6 months ago, but unfortunately we are still not sure who will be in the squad."

He also mirrored the views of ex-Pakistani coach Geoff Lawson in claiming, "There is lot of instability in the team like the board and if Pakistan does well, it has to be due to individual brilliance." (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

"Yousuf should concentrate only on Test cricket": Moin Khan

Check out Which Cricketer is Driving Which Car! Zigwheels.com/Cricketers-Cars
Former Pakistan cricket captain Mohammad Yousuf should focus only on the Test format of the game, his compatriot and former wicketkeeper Moin Khan has said.

"Yousuf should concentrate only on Test cricket," PakPassion.net quoted Moin, as saying.

He felt that Yousuf does not warrant selection in the Pakistan World Cup Squad due to being dogged by injuries of late, and although he was selected for the recently concluded ODI series against South Africa in UAE, he was only able to play the final game before being ruled out of the Test series against the Proteas after picking up a recurrence of his old groin injury.


"How can you select a player (for the final ODI) who has fitness issues and he has just recovered, and arrived in the UAE ahead of a young guy who has been playing well."

Moin was of the view that the rigours of One-day Internationals and Twenty20 cricket were no longer for the Pakistani batting stalwart, and that his spot should be filled by the young and impressive right-hand top order batsman, Asad Shafiq.

"Yousuf has a lot of fitness issues and a young player like Asad should get a chance. Asad was playing well in the ODI against South Africa but for some reason he was dropped for Yousuf."

As the cricket world prepares for the World Cup event to be held in the subcontinent next year, Moin was circumspect on Pakistan's chances.

"PCB have made a lot of mess. The team should have been finalised 6 months ago, but unfortunately we are still not sure who will be in the squad."

He also mirrored the views of ex-Pakistani coach Geoff Lawson in claiming, "There is lot of instability in the team like the board and if Pakistan does well, it has to be due to individual brilliance." (ANI)

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Capes are back in fashion

Choice of game
Day three, first Ashes Test, 'Gabba, Brisbane. The first stop on the way through all five Tests.

Team supported
Australia. It's our turn to win it back.

Key performer
On a day when two men batted for nearly three sessions, you'd have to go for Mr Cricket and Brad "The New Gilchrist" Haddin.
They performed amazingly well. England bowled dangerously in the morning with no luck, after that it was all Australia. The mammoth partnership was helped along by what can only be described as "woeful" fielding.


One thing I'd have changed
Today was as close to perfect as one could ask for. Being greedy I could easily say one or two wickets before stumps, but that would take away from tomorrow's play. Actually, Strauss out at first ball would have been handy.

Face-off I relished
The ball v England's fielders. It's just come out that Monty is doubling as fielding coach and his influence has been monstrous. Never before has a team dived, slipped, fell, collapsed and back-flipped (well, not back-flipped) while fielding. The two dropped catches, while difficult in their own right, were not a surprise. Not Anderson's day.

Wow moment
On a day with many highlights, again I'd say the two shots that brought up the batsmen's centuries. Hussey first; his cover-drive was all class, a shot he plays better then anyone when in form. I got a touch emotional when he raised the bat.

Power and timing defined Haddin's innings, and what a way to bring your ton up!

Player watch
The most interesting player to watch was KP. All this talk about him being separated from the rest of the team seemed justified. It looked like he was always a long way from the team. Perhaps he was trying not to catch what the others had, or trying to forget what Monty had taught him.

Shot of the day
One that was not offered. Strauss nearly got himself out first ball after leaving a looping Ben Hilfenhaus delivery that nearly got the finger pointing in the right direction. A good decision in the end, and Ponting wasted a referral in the process.

Crowd meter
Over 34,000 packed out the Gabba, but it was a group of seven or eight guys sitting next to me that made the day. The afternoon session saw the lovely young Usher become the main attraction, with a new (but familiar) group devoted to the services of dear Tamara. Mickey, Barry, Brucey, Pauly, Spearsey and the rest often shared with the crowd that everywhere they go, the people want to know, who she is, where she comes from and that Tamara's Army will be there for her.

Fancy-dress index
Capes are back in, so all you budding necromancers and would-be superheroes come out and show what you've got. Also Morph suits, but they seem tricky.

Entertainment
Apart form the enthralling cricket, the breaks showed kids display the future of Australian cricket, plus a family competition with a car to be won. The English family won easy, but to be honest, the tea break was focused on Tamara and her Army.

Accessories
I resisted the urge to purchase a radio, which might have been a blunder. Food is expensive, so Sam's Smart Travel Tip for today: pack some food.

My opinion of the opposition
Tough day for England. Steve Finn got the figures but Stuart Broad was the pick of the seamers. Graeme Swann isn't living up to the hype, yet. Strauss's think-tank dried up quickly, which provided interesting and questionable fields.

Overall
Great day for an Australian. Firmly on top with two exciting days to follow. News is that Tamara has the day off tomorrow. Her successor better have the goods or heckling might not be limited to the tourists.

Marks out of 10
9. If I wasn't feeling the effects from the night before, the day might have been perfect.

What tomorrow holds
Day four looks to be the make-or-break day for England. Will England resist? Can Xavier Doherty and Marcus North spin Australia to victory? And can a beer snake reach around the entire ground? Those questions and more will be answered tomorrow! (but if you cant wait, no, yes, probably not).

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Capes are back in fashion

Choice of game
Day three, first Ashes Test, 'Gabba, Brisbane. The first stop on the way through all five Tests.

Team supported
Australia. It's our turn to win it back.

Key performer
On a day when two men batted for nearly three sessions, you'd have to go for Mr Cricket and Brad "The New Gilchrist" Haddin.
They performed amazingly well. England bowled dangerously in the morning with no luck, after that it was all Australia. The mammoth partnership was helped along by what can only be described as "woeful" fielding.


One thing I'd have changed
Today was as close to perfect as one could ask for. Being greedy I could easily say one or two wickets before stumps, but that would take away from tomorrow's play. Actually, Strauss out at first ball would have been handy.

Face-off I relished
The ball v England's fielders. It's just come out that Monty is doubling as fielding coach and his influence has been monstrous. Never before has a team dived, slipped, fell, collapsed and back-flipped (well, not back-flipped) while fielding. The two dropped catches, while difficult in their own right, were not a surprise. Not Anderson's day.

Wow moment
On a day with many highlights, again I'd say the two shots that brought up the batsmen's centuries. Hussey first; his cover-drive was all class, a shot he plays better then anyone when in form. I got a touch emotional when he raised the bat.

Power and timing defined Haddin's innings, and what a way to bring your ton up!

Player watch
The most interesting player to watch was KP. All this talk about him being separated from the rest of the team seemed justified. It looked like he was always a long way from the team. Perhaps he was trying not to catch what the others had, or trying to forget what Monty had taught him.

Shot of the day
One that was not offered. Strauss nearly got himself out first ball after leaving a looping Ben Hilfenhaus delivery that nearly got the finger pointing in the right direction. A good decision in the end, and Ponting wasted a referral in the process.

Crowd meter
Over 34,000 packed out the Gabba, but it was a group of seven or eight guys sitting next to me that made the day. The afternoon session saw the lovely young Usher become the main attraction, with a new (but familiar) group devoted to the services of dear Tamara. Mickey, Barry, Brucey, Pauly, Spearsey and the rest often shared with the crowd that everywhere they go, the people want to know, who she is, where she comes from and that Tamara's Army will be there for her.

Fancy-dress index
Capes are back in, so all you budding necromancers and would-be superheroes come out and show what you've got. Also Morph suits, but they seem tricky.

Entertainment
Apart form the enthralling cricket, the breaks showed kids display the future of Australian cricket, plus a family competition with a car to be won. The English family won easy, but to be honest, the tea break was focused on Tamara and her Army.

Accessories
I resisted the urge to purchase a radio, which might have been a blunder. Food is expensive, so Sam's Smart Travel Tip for today: pack some food.

My opinion of the opposition
Tough day for England. Steve Finn got the figures but Stuart Broad was the pick of the seamers. Graeme Swann isn't living up to the hype, yet. Strauss's think-tank dried up quickly, which provided interesting and questionable fields.

Overall
Great day for an Australian. Firmly on top with two exciting days to follow. News is that Tamara has the day off tomorrow. Her successor better have the goods or heckling might not be limited to the tourists.

Marks out of 10
9. If I wasn't feeling the effects from the night before, the day might have been perfect.

What tomorrow holds
Day four looks to be the make-or-break day for England. Will England resist? Can Xavier Doherty and Marcus North spin Australia to victory? And can a beer snake reach around the entire ground? Those questions and more will be answered tomorrow! (but if you cant wait, no, yes, probably not).

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

War affected Afghanistan dream of being Cricket Stars

In early 2010, aspiring documentary makers Tio Albone, Leslie Knott and Lucy Martens showed the world one of the greatest stories of sports. It was aptly titled Out of the Ashes and it followed the amazing story of the Afghanistan cricket team as they climbed up through the world rankings. The story was a fairytale in the true sense as the war ravaged nation struggled through many hardships to see their country rise in international esteem.


This year, Afghanistan’s cricket made history as they won the silver medal at the Asian Games 2010 in Guangzhou, China. The multi-sport event was already making headlines as cricket made its debut at the Asian Games however, the Afghani team recorded an bigger historic landmark as they managed to stage an upset after defeating gold medal favourites Pakistan to reach the final.

Afghanistan Captain Mohammad Nabi said that the war in his country has affected the progress in Afghanistan’s cricket.
Afghanistan strode confidently through Asian Games to get to the finals but lost the gold to a more experienced Bangladesh.

But Nabi said that he is very happy with Friday’s silver medal as it means a lot to all the people back home who have seen nothing but strife in the three decades of war their country has witnessed.

He hoped that the second place would provide “enough inspiration” to Afghanistan’s cricket administrations to start looking into facilities such as more professional grounds for the young and aspiring players.

He said that his team got inspired by Bangladesh who has worked hard to get to its Test status and the authorities are also involved in promoting cricket throughout the country as they organize domestic cricketing events the year round.

Afghanistan has only one complete working pitch with the turf in the country’s capital, Kabul, whereas Jalalabad also has some concrete pitches.

Afghanistan’s coach Rashid Latif said that there are millions of young and talented players from Afghan cities like Khost, Kuna and Jalalabad but they remain in the shadows as there are no official and established local clubs that would help them in coming to the fore.

Latif, who is a former international player and has played with Pakistan’s national side admitted that if Afghanistan needs to progress in international cricket, they must be provided with the basic facilities such as the development of grounds.

Afghanistan would now be preparing for next week’s ICC Intercontinental Cup in Dubai against Scotland. Nabi said that the team is slowly progressing in limited overs and needs more exposure and experience to be considered for matches against cricket’s top 10 countries.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

War affected Afghanistan dream of being Cricket Stars

In early 2010, aspiring documentary makers Tio Albone, Leslie Knott and Lucy Martens showed the world one of the greatest stories of sports. It was aptly titled Out of the Ashes and it followed the amazing story of the Afghanistan cricket team as they climbed up through the world rankings. The story was a fairytale in the true sense as the war ravaged nation struggled through many hardships to see their country rise in international esteem.


This year, Afghanistan’s cricket made history as they won the silver medal at the Asian Games 2010 in Guangzhou, China. The multi-sport event was already making headlines as cricket made its debut at the Asian Games however, the Afghani team recorded an bigger historic landmark as they managed to stage an upset after defeating gold medal favourites Pakistan to reach the final.

Afghanistan Captain Mohammad Nabi said that the war in his country has affected the progress in Afghanistan’s cricket.
Afghanistan strode confidently through Asian Games to get to the finals but lost the gold to a more experienced Bangladesh.

But Nabi said that he is very happy with Friday’s silver medal as it means a lot to all the people back home who have seen nothing but strife in the three decades of war their country has witnessed.

He hoped that the second place would provide “enough inspiration” to Afghanistan’s cricket administrations to start looking into facilities such as more professional grounds for the young and aspiring players.

He said that his team got inspired by Bangladesh who has worked hard to get to its Test status and the authorities are also involved in promoting cricket throughout the country as they organize domestic cricketing events the year round.

Afghanistan has only one complete working pitch with the turf in the country’s capital, Kabul, whereas Jalalabad also has some concrete pitches.

Afghanistan’s coach Rashid Latif said that there are millions of young and talented players from Afghan cities like Khost, Kuna and Jalalabad but they remain in the shadows as there are no official and established local clubs that would help them in coming to the fore.

Latif, who is a former international player and has played with Pakistan’s national side admitted that if Afghanistan needs to progress in international cricket, they must be provided with the basic facilities such as the development of grounds.

Afghanistan would now be preparing for next week’s ICC Intercontinental Cup in Dubai against Scotland. Nabi said that the team is slowly progressing in limited overs and needs more exposure and experience to be considered for matches against cricket’s top 10 countries.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Friday, November 26, 2010

Curator assures sporting wicket for Sunday's Ind-NZ ODI

He was criticised a year ago for an unsporting pitch where Australia dismissed India for a paltry 170, but Assam Cricket Association curator Sunil Barua on Friday said that the strip for Sunday's ODI against New Zealand would be the best turf he had ever prepared in his career. An 8.30 am start

coupled with the early morning dew in this north-eastern city might pose some initial trouble for the batsmen but once the sun shines, it will be lively and sporting wicket at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, Barua said.
"I know there were a lot of criticism last time. I don't want to talk about that. I can just say, it will be a lively and sporting wicket," Barua said.


"There will be a good total if a team bats the full quota of overs. This is the best wicket I've ever made. It will suit batting," he said, without predicting any score.

In the last match which was played in Guwahati on November 8 2009, India collapsed to 27 for five before being skittled out for 170 by Australia, who registered a easy six-wicket win to clinch the series.

Barua said that he had given a top-dressing of the pitch with a special clay collected from outside so as to ensure less wear and tear.

He also said that being a multipurpose ground, where the Bordoloi Gold Cup football tournament was held recently, one should not expect a smooth outfield.

Asked about the uneven grass, he said, "It's a multipurpose ground and we got about two and half months time to prepare this. The groundsmen have done a good job."

One hour before the start of play on Sunday morning the groundstaff will rope the field and supersoper will be pressed into service to dry out the dew.

"It takes about 30 minutes to clear the dew," Barua, who is handling the wicket since the stadium hosted its first ODI in 1983, said.

Earlier both the teams arrived in Guwahati from Nagpur by a special chartered flight amid tight security blanket at the Lokapriya Gopinath Bordoloi airport.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Nabi says war is affecting Afghanistan progress in cricket

China - When Mohammad Nabi starts dreaming about how much his team of part-timers from Afghanistan could achieve in the international cricket arena, one issue always takes him quickly back to reality.
Three decades of war mean there's almost nowhere decent to practice or play.

Still, it hasn't stopped Afghanistan's rise from the lowest level of the international game to the brink of breaking into the top echelon.

Afghanistan made more significant inroads at the Asian Games in Guangzhou by beating hot favourite Pakistan in the semifinals to set up a gold-medal match against Bangladesh.
In the end, though, with tension mounting in the final overs, the highly experienced Bangladesh lineup won with just three balls to spare.


Both countries were vying for their first gold medal at the Asian Games — and in a sport which is making its debut in the Olympic-style continental event.
"I am happy with today's silver. It means a lot to all our people back home, who are badly affected with the war," Nabi said. "Even though we lost the gold today, this silver medal will give enough inspiration to our administrators to start building playing facilities so that more and more young players could be attracted toward this game."

Afghanistan has never hosted an international match. It has only one ground with a proper turf pitch in Kabul, but there are some concrete pitches in Jalalabad.
According to coach Rashid Latif, a former international cricketer from Pakistan, the cities of Khost, Kunar, Kabul and Jalalabad attract thousands of players. But there are no proper, established clubs due to a lack of facilities.
A Twenty20 tournament was organized in Kabul two months ago in which 24 provinces participated.
"Ground development is must if Afghanistan wants to progress in international cricket," Latif said.
Afghanistan was seeded directly into the quarterfinals at Guangzhou after regional powerhouse India opted out of the competition.
It defeated Hong Kong in the quarterfinals, but the biggest upset came in the semifinal when it stunned Pakistan by 22 runs in the semis.
From here, Afghanistan will prepare for the five-day Inter-Continental Cup final at Dubai next month against Scotland. The Afghanis defeated Zimbabwe, Kenya, Canada and Scotland in group matches to qualify.
"This shows that we are doing well and now we must do something to build grounds back in Afghanistan," Nabi said. "Afghanistan has limited-overs international and Twenty20 international status from the International Cricket Council, but needs a lot more international experience to be considered serious competition for the sport's top 10 countries.
That's where Latif comes in.
Latif tried to inspire his Afghan lineup to beat Bangladesh by recalling some famous upset victories from the past, such as India's shocking 1983 World Cup victory over the then all-powerful West Indies and Greek football team's European championship win in 2004.
Afghanistan was well on course for another upset until the penultimate over of the competition.
Mohammad Shabbir hit two successive sixes off Karim Khan Sadeq's offspin bowling to record a five-wicket win and a maiden gold for Bangladesh.
"History has examples of successful teams that has players with less talent and fitness than their opponents," Latif had urged his players. "India pulled of what probably (is) the biggest shock in history of cricket ....Greece (also) won the 2004 Euro Cup.
"Clearly these teams did not suddenly produce more skill or fitness so the key to these upsets involved better minds."
Latif said the message went well with all the team members, but they miscalculated fast bowler Hamid Hasan's overs. He was left with only two runs to defend in the very last over after Sadeq conceded 17 runs.
Latif told them clearly about their position in the pecking order in a note before the game.
"Warning! Bangladesh can come with more superior mind strength at today's final," Latif wrote. "I didn't want to intervene in their planning because I am not that type of coach who gives instructions from outside at crucial times."
Cricket will again feature at the 2014 Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea, where the test-playing countries will be more wary of Afghanistan.
But Latif said this competition was the ideal platform for teams like his to upset the sport's establishment.
"The test playing nations have a busy international schedule so they always send their second-string teams in such events like Asian Games, Latif said. "Teams like Nepal and Afghanistan are growing fast and such tournaments give them a chance to compete against test nations."

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Curator assures sporting wicket for Sunday's Ind-NZ ODI

He was criticised a year ago for an unsporting pitch where Australia dismissed India for a paltry 170, but Assam Cricket Association curator Sunil Barua on Friday said that the strip for Sunday's ODI against New Zealand would be the best turf he had ever prepared in his career. An 8.30 am start

coupled with the early morning dew in this north-eastern city might pose some initial trouble for the batsmen but once the sun shines, it will be lively and sporting wicket at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, Barua said.
"I know there were a lot of criticism last time. I don't want to talk about that. I can just say, it will be a lively and sporting wicket," Barua said.


"There will be a good total if a team bats the full quota of overs. This is the best wicket I've ever made. It will suit batting," he said, without predicting any score.

In the last match which was played in Guwahati on November 8 2009, India collapsed to 27 for five before being skittled out for 170 by Australia, who registered a easy six-wicket win to clinch the series.

Barua said that he had given a top-dressing of the pitch with a special clay collected from outside so as to ensure less wear and tear.

He also said that being a multipurpose ground, where the Bordoloi Gold Cup football tournament was held recently, one should not expect a smooth outfield.

Asked about the uneven grass, he said, "It's a multipurpose ground and we got about two and half months time to prepare this. The groundsmen have done a good job."

One hour before the start of play on Sunday morning the groundstaff will rope the field and supersoper will be pressed into service to dry out the dew.

"It takes about 30 minutes to clear the dew," Barua, who is handling the wicket since the stadium hosted its first ODI in 1983, said.

Earlier both the teams arrived in Guwahati from Nagpur by a special chartered flight amid tight security blanket at the Lokapriya Gopinath Bordoloi airport.

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Nabi says war is affecting Afghanistan progress in cricket

China - When Mohammad Nabi starts dreaming about how much his team of part-timers from Afghanistan could achieve in the international cricket arena, one issue always takes him quickly back to reality.
Three decades of war mean there's almost nowhere decent to practice or play.

Still, it hasn't stopped Afghanistan's rise from the lowest level of the international game to the brink of breaking into the top echelon.

Afghanistan made more significant inroads at the Asian Games in Guangzhou by beating hot favourite Pakistan in the semifinals to set up a gold-medal match against Bangladesh.
In the end, though, with tension mounting in the final overs, the highly experienced Bangladesh lineup won with just three balls to spare.


Both countries were vying for their first gold medal at the Asian Games — and in a sport which is making its debut in the Olympic-style continental event.
"I am happy with today's silver. It means a lot to all our people back home, who are badly affected with the war," Nabi said. "Even though we lost the gold today, this silver medal will give enough inspiration to our administrators to start building playing facilities so that more and more young players could be attracted toward this game."

Afghanistan has never hosted an international match. It has only one ground with a proper turf pitch in Kabul, but there are some concrete pitches in Jalalabad.
According to coach Rashid Latif, a former international cricketer from Pakistan, the cities of Khost, Kunar, Kabul and Jalalabad attract thousands of players. But there are no proper, established clubs due to a lack of facilities.
A Twenty20 tournament was organized in Kabul two months ago in which 24 provinces participated.
"Ground development is must if Afghanistan wants to progress in international cricket," Latif said.
Afghanistan was seeded directly into the quarterfinals at Guangzhou after regional powerhouse India opted out of the competition.
It defeated Hong Kong in the quarterfinals, but the biggest upset came in the semifinal when it stunned Pakistan by 22 runs in the semis.
From here, Afghanistan will prepare for the five-day Inter-Continental Cup final at Dubai next month against Scotland. The Afghanis defeated Zimbabwe, Kenya, Canada and Scotland in group matches to qualify.
"This shows that we are doing well and now we must do something to build grounds back in Afghanistan," Nabi said. "Afghanistan has limited-overs international and Twenty20 international status from the International Cricket Council, but needs a lot more international experience to be considered serious competition for the sport's top 10 countries.
That's where Latif comes in.
Latif tried to inspire his Afghan lineup to beat Bangladesh by recalling some famous upset victories from the past, such as India's shocking 1983 World Cup victory over the then all-powerful West Indies and Greek football team's European championship win in 2004.
Afghanistan was well on course for another upset until the penultimate over of the competition.
Mohammad Shabbir hit two successive sixes off Karim Khan Sadeq's offspin bowling to record a five-wicket win and a maiden gold for Bangladesh.
"History has examples of successful teams that has players with less talent and fitness than their opponents," Latif had urged his players. "India pulled of what probably (is) the biggest shock in history of cricket ....Greece (also) won the 2004 Euro Cup.
"Clearly these teams did not suddenly produce more skill or fitness so the key to these upsets involved better minds."
Latif said the message went well with all the team members, but they miscalculated fast bowler Hamid Hasan's overs. He was left with only two runs to defend in the very last over after Sadeq conceded 17 runs.
Latif told them clearly about their position in the pecking order in a note before the game.
"Warning! Bangladesh can come with more superior mind strength at today's final," Latif wrote. "I didn't want to intervene in their planning because I am not that type of coach who gives instructions from outside at crucial times."
Cricket will again feature at the 2014 Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea, where the test-playing countries will be more wary of Afghanistan.
But Latif said this competition was the ideal platform for teams like his to upset the sport's establishment.
"The test playing nations have a busy international schedule so they always send their second-string teams in such events like Asian Games, Latif said. "Teams like Nepal and Afghanistan are growing fast and such tournaments give them a chance to compete against test nations."

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Stock up on hot chocolate, this is poised to be an unforgettable Ashes series...

What we have here, when all the hype and the hoopla is stripped away, is a battle between the fourth and fifth-ranked cricket nations in the world. It isn’t quite Haye-Harrison, but it is certainly not Ali-Frazier, either.

Yet while there is better cricket to be had around the world, there is not bigger and the reason the first Ashes Test in Brisbane remains so captivating is that with such a massive prize at stake, neither team has yet been capable of taking the game away from the opposition.

England’s batsmen built several good innings on day one, but then chucked their wickets away, while on day two Australia lacked a second high score in the top order to accompany Mike Hussey and claim the upper hand.


Had there been a Ricky Ponting ton, for instance – and let’s be honest, we were all expecting one – this would as good as be Australia’s match by now. Instead the first session on Saturday morning, scheduled to start 30 minutes early weather permitting, with Australia on 220 for five and England taking the new ball, may well prove pivotal.
If Hussey, 81 not out, can push on to secure a lead of 100, there will be added pressure and England could be in trouble; if Australia are shot out quickly, batting last on a pitch with a dirty great crack emerging in the pitching area for spin bowlers, it could be the break Graeme Swann needs.

It is delicately poised but only because Test matches between unexceptional teams usually are.
When Australia were the best in the world, Ashes Test matches in Brisbane were often high on stellar cricket, low on drama because there was only ever going to be one winner. Right now, it is too close to call. We are no longer off our seats, but we are at least on the edge of them.
'The game is right on the line at the moment,' said Hussey. 'It’s 50-50. Whoever can wrestle the initiative next will be in a commanding position. The first two hours on Saturday could well be the most important session in the match; it could all come down to one ball or one catch. The teams are very close, but they have respect for each other. And it is the Ashes, so it is the biggest series of our lives.'
And that is the key. There is finer cricket, but it is not Ashes cricket. This is our squabble with Australia and we love it, and in the wider world of Test cricket right now it may be considered rather ordinary stuff, but that misses the point.
Liverpool are a long way off from challenging for the title this season but Sir Alex Ferguson, the Manchester United manager, still says the trip to Anfield represents the biggest fixture in his calendar. There is too much history for it to be devalued by vagaries such as form and standing.
India, South Africa and Sri Lanka are all superior Test playing nations right now. When it mattered in the deciding Test of the 2009-10 tour, South Africa took England to the cleaners in Johannesburg. India have lost two Test matches since March 2006, and Sri Lanka, who have not lost a Test series to an opponent other than India since touring Australia in November 2007.
India’s batsmen would quite probably have been heading for 400 on this track, as would Sri Lanka’s. South Africa could make either team on show in Brisbane uncomfortable. Yet somehow this is irrelevant. Somehow, even if the quality of the cricket is that of two mid-table Test nations, the occasion transcends this. There is an emerging feeling that we could be witnessing a great modern Ashes series, simply because the teams are so matched in their fallibility.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Stock up on hot chocolate, this is poised to be an unforgettable Ashes series...

What we have here, when all the hype and the hoopla is stripped away, is a battle between the fourth and fifth-ranked cricket nations in the world. It isn’t quite Haye-Harrison, but it is certainly not Ali-Frazier, either.

Yet while there is better cricket to be had around the world, there is not bigger and the reason the first Ashes Test in Brisbane remains so captivating is that with such a massive prize at stake, neither team has yet been capable of taking the game away from the opposition.

England’s batsmen built several good innings on day one, but then chucked their wickets away, while on day two Australia lacked a second high score in the top order to accompany Mike Hussey and claim the upper hand.


Had there been a Ricky Ponting ton, for instance – and let’s be honest, we were all expecting one – this would as good as be Australia’s match by now. Instead the first session on Saturday morning, scheduled to start 30 minutes early weather permitting, with Australia on 220 for five and England taking the new ball, may well prove pivotal.
If Hussey, 81 not out, can push on to secure a lead of 100, there will be added pressure and England could be in trouble; if Australia are shot out quickly, batting last on a pitch with a dirty great crack emerging in the pitching area for spin bowlers, it could be the break Graeme Swann needs.

It is delicately poised but only because Test matches between unexceptional teams usually are.
When Australia were the best in the world, Ashes Test matches in Brisbane were often high on stellar cricket, low on drama because there was only ever going to be one winner. Right now, it is too close to call. We are no longer off our seats, but we are at least on the edge of them.
'The game is right on the line at the moment,' said Hussey. 'It’s 50-50. Whoever can wrestle the initiative next will be in a commanding position. The first two hours on Saturday could well be the most important session in the match; it could all come down to one ball or one catch. The teams are very close, but they have respect for each other. And it is the Ashes, so it is the biggest series of our lives.'
And that is the key. There is finer cricket, but it is not Ashes cricket. This is our squabble with Australia and we love it, and in the wider world of Test cricket right now it may be considered rather ordinary stuff, but that misses the point.
Liverpool are a long way off from challenging for the title this season but Sir Alex Ferguson, the Manchester United manager, still says the trip to Anfield represents the biggest fixture in his calendar. There is too much history for it to be devalued by vagaries such as form and standing.
India, South Africa and Sri Lanka are all superior Test playing nations right now. When it mattered in the deciding Test of the 2009-10 tour, South Africa took England to the cleaners in Johannesburg. India have lost two Test matches since March 2006, and Sri Lanka, who have not lost a Test series to an opponent other than India since touring Australia in November 2007.
India’s batsmen would quite probably have been heading for 400 on this track, as would Sri Lanka’s. South Africa could make either team on show in Brisbane uncomfortable. Yet somehow this is irrelevant. Somehow, even if the quality of the cricket is that of two mid-table Test nations, the occasion transcends this. There is an emerging feeling that we could be witnessing a great modern Ashes series, simply because the teams are so matched in their fallibility.

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com

Thursday, November 25, 2010

CSA need a good clean up

I wanted to praise AB de Villiers this week, for an innings of immense technical skill and control (and a little luck) which has elevated his name to the top of the South African Test batting tree.

But De Villiersbrilliance in Abu Dhabi has been overshadowed by the murky goings-on in the boardroom at Cricket South Africa, and instead of the organisation basking in the glow of De Villiers’ achievement, it is instead choking on the stench of a report that exonerated their chief executive.

Gerald Majola’s “error of judgement” was an honest mistake, and he will be taken through “processes” to ensure he doesn’t make the same errors again. What those “processes” will be, no one seems to know, how long it will take, is also a mystery. Majola has been here before.


The report by AK Khan’s committee describes CSA’s chief executive as being “naive” in matters concerning finance and that Majola’s over-reliance on former chief operating officer Don McIntosh was one of the primary reasons the bonuses paid to senior CSA employees weren’t properly revealed.

That’s the second time in recent years that Majola’s placed too much faith in a financial expert; the last time it was Ditheko Modise, and he ended up in jail for defrauding the organisation of over R7-million.

If Paul Harris (a former independent board member, and chairman of CSA’s remuneration committee), Colin Beggs (the former chairman of CSA’s audit committee) and Hentie van Wyk (the former chairman of the finance committee) go ahead with threats of court action, then this controversy will run and run.

And at the moment Cricket SA can ill-afford that. The organisation’s reputation has already taken a serious hit over how lackadaisically – at best – the CEO is handling the finances and at a time when many big companies are questioning their involvement in sport as the global economic downturn continues to bite, CSA need to show a clean slate to any potential investors.

But when potential sponsors look at Khan’s report and see that an auditing firm – Deloitte – was “instructed by (CSA’s) audit committee not to interrogate the account of IPL” you wonder whether companies really want to involve themselves with CSA at this stage.

There’s lots of good about South African cricket at the moment. The national team is one of the best in the world, and play against India in a few weeks, in a battle of the world’s best two Test sides. Then there’s a World Cup later. However, the game’s administrators need to clean up their act. Are they willing to do so?

For More Detail Visit @ Livecricketnewz.blogspot.com